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Leo Strauss: The Early Writings, 1921-1932 (Suny Series in the Jewish Writings of Strauss)

Leo Strauss: The Early Writings, 1921-1932 (Suny Series in the Jewish Writings of Strauss)

Presents the early published writings of the distinguished political philosopher Leo Strauss, available here for the first time in English.This translation of eighteen virtually unknown early publications provides access for the first time to the origins of Leo Strauss's thought in the intellectual life of the German Jewish 'renaissance' in the 1920s. Themes range from the Enlightenment critique of the religion of Spinoza and the anti-critique of Jacobi, to the political Zionism of Herzl and the cultural Zionism of Buber and Ahad Ha'am. The essays and reviews reprinted in this volume document a youth caught in the “theological-political” conflict between the irretrievability of premodern religion and the disenchantedness of “honest” atheism, an impossible alternative that precipitated Strauss to seek out the possibility of a return to the level of natural ignorance presupposed in Socratic political philosophy.

Arab and Jewish Immigrants in Latin America: Images and Realities

Arab and Jewish Immigrants in Latin America: Images and Realities

This collection of essays addresses various aspects of Arab and Jewish immigration and acculturation in Latin America. The volume examines how the Latin American elites who were keen to change their countries' ethnic mix felt threatened by the arrival of Arabs and Jews.

America's War with Spain: A Selected Bibliography

America's War with Spain: A Selected Bibliography

This Selected Bibliography has become a standard source on the War with Spain. Used by all interested in the war that made America an imperial power, the earlier work is often cited by book dealers, librarians, and researchers as well as students and buffs. Often recording information not readily available elsewhere, this revised, current edition covers:* Foreign and domestic events and battles* The U.S. Army and Navy* Press and public opinion* Actions in Cuba, the Philippines, Puerto Rico, and Guam* Medical and sanitary conditions* Relief efforts* The role of Black Americans* Expansion and anti-imperialism* Literature and music of the warTwo indexes complete the book.

Death on the Hellships: Prisoners at Sea in the Pacific War

Death on the Hellships: Prisoners at Sea in the Pacific War

Fully documents the scope of the allied POW ordeal on the Japanese ships that moved them from island to island for work in World War II.

Vietnam: State, War, and Revolution (1945-1946)

Vietnam: State, War, and Revolution (1945-1946)

Amidst the revolutionary euphoria of August 1945, most Vietnamese believed that colonialism and war were being left behind in favor of independence and modernization. The late-September British-French coup de force in Saigon cast a pall over such assumptions. Ho Chi Minh tried to negotiate a mutually advantageous relationship with France, but meanwhile told his lieutenants to plan for a war in which the nascent state might have to survive without allies. In this landmark study, David Marr evokes the uncertainty and contingency as well as coherence and momentum of fast-paced events. Mining recently accessible sources in Aix-en-Provence and Hanoi, Marr explains what became the largest, most intense mobilization of human resources ever seen in Vietnam.

Honor Among Enemies (Honor Harrington #6)

Honor Among Enemies (Honor Harrington #6)

For Captain Honor Harrington, it's sometimes hard to know who the enemy really is. Offered a chance to reclaim her career as an officer of the Royal Manticoran Navy, she is given command of a 'squadron' of jury-rigged merchantmen with crew drawn from the dregs of her service, and ordered to somehow stop the pirates who have taken advantage of the Havenite War to plunder the Star Kingdom's commerce. But the pirates are not all they seem - and neither are some of her 'friends'. For Honor has been carefully chosen for her mission - by two implacable and powerful enemies. The way they see it, either she stops the raiders or the raiders kill her - either way, they win.

The Documentary History of the Ratification of the Constitution, Volume XIX: Ratification of the Constitution By The States: New York, No. 1

The Documentary History of the Ratification of the Constitution, Volume XIX: Ratification of the Constitution By The States: New York, No. 1

Volume XIX is the first of five volumes in this set, which covers New York State's public and private debates about the Constitution and the calling of the state ratifying convention. The volumes feature countless newspaper items and letters along with New York Ratification chronologies, lists of office holders, and extensive editors' notes. In 1787, after the Constitution was published, Antifederalists published a series of essays in New York newspapers, aggressively criticizing the document. Federalists quickly responded with their own series of essays, including the greatest defense and explanation of the Constitution, The Federalist, written by "Publius" (Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison). The debate had national implications as New York newspapers quickly became the main source of Federalist and Antifederalist propaganda.

Prisoner of War Escape & Evasion: How to Survive Behind Enemy Lines from the World's Elite Military Units

Prisoner of War Escape & Evasion: How to Survive Behind Enemy Lines from the World's Elite Military Units

This book offers useful tips and solid advice on how to evade capture and, if that fails, how to escape. Key topics include the will to survive; handling stress in captivity; escape techniques; survival in a variety of environments, including urban, rural, jungle and desert; how to forage for food; tracking and how to cover your tracks; navigation, with or without a map; and seeking recovery by friendly forces. The book also includes a number of real life accounts of prisoner of war escape from World War II, including The Great Escape story and Colditz, the Vietnam War (Dieter Dengler, with others, escaping from Laos), the Balkans, Iraq (Thomas Hamill in 2004) and Afghanistan. With more than 120 black and white artworks and with easy-to-follow text, Prisoner Of War Escape and Evasion is for anyone who wants to know how to survive in the most stressful of circumstances and emerge a winner. Presented in a handy, pocket-size format, this is a book you could take with you into the field; and it could save your life.

The Egyptian Problem

The Egyptian Problem

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. This text refers to the Bibliobazaar edition.

A History of Napoleonic and American Prisoners of War 1756-1816: Hulk, Depot and Parole (Napoleonic Wars) (v. 1)

A History of Napoleonic and American Prisoners of War 1756-1816: Hulk, Depot and Parole (Napoleonic Wars) (v. 1)

Whilst many books have been published about war, the role of the prisoner of war has been largely ignored or paid scant attention. This book, along with the author's other title - The Arts and Crafts of Napoleonic and American Prisoners of War 1756-1816 - aims to correct this imbalance, and is the result of the author's quest over thirty years into this almost-forgotten field of history. Part One tells of the various wars that saw the men, from many different countries, become prisoners. Tales of individuals and their voyages, mutinies, fortunes and failures also feature, adding more personal touches to the history and, as with the author's other title, all the accounts are written in a highly evocative style. Part Two is largely devoted to the prison hulks, describing the vessels and the conditions on board that the prisoners would have had to endure. Many of these hulks were former warships. Now stripped of all their equipment, and with their masts, sails and rigging removed, they sat disabled

The Fragility of Goodness: Why Bulgaria's Jews Survived the Holocaust

The Fragility of Goodness: Why Bulgaria's Jews Survived the Holocaust

With the exception of Denmark, Bulgaria was the only country allied with Nazi Germany that did not annihilate or turn over its Jewish population. Here a prominent French intellectual with Bulgarian roots accounts for this singularity. Tzvetan Todorov assembles and interprets for the first time key evidence from this episode of Bulgarian history, including letters, diaries, government reports, and memoirs--most never before translated into any language. Through these documents, he reconstructs what happened in Bulgaria during World War II and interrogates collective memories of that time. He recounts the actions of individuals and groups that, ultimately and collectively, spared Bulgaria's Jews the fate of most European Jews. The Bulgaria that emerges is not a heroic country dramatically different from those countries where Jews did perish. Todorov does find heroes, especially parliament deputy Dimitar Peshev, certain writers and clergy, and--most inspiring--public opinion. Yet he is forced to conclude that the "good" triumphed to the extent that it did because of a tenuous chain of events. Any break in that chain--one intellectual who didn't speak up as forcefully, a different composition in Orthodox Church leadership, a misstep by a particular politician, a less wily king--would have undone all of the other efforts with disastrous results for almost 50,000 people. The meaning Todorov settles on is this: Once evil is introduced into public view, it spreads easily, whereas goodness is temporary, difficult, rare, and fragile. And yet possible.

Germany's Black Holocaust: 1890-1945: Details Never Before Revealed!

Germany's Black Holocaust: 1890-1945: Details Never Before Revealed!

In the 1890s Blacks were tortured in German concentration camps in Southwest Africa (now called Namibia) when Adolph Hitler was only a child. Colonial German doctors conducted unspeakable medical experiments on these emaciated helpless Africans decades before such atrocities were ever visited upon the Jews. Thousands of Africans were massacred. Regrettably, historians neglected to properly register the slaughter—that is, to lift it from the footnote in history that it had been relegated to—until now. In an attempt to give the incidents their rightful recognition in the historical context of the Holocaust, Dr. Firpo W. Carr has authored a new book entitled, Germany’s Black Holocaust: 1890–1945. In it, he reveals the startling hidden history of Black victims of the Holocaust. The mayhem and carnage date back to the turn of the 20th century, many years before there were ever any other unfortunate victims—Jew or Gentile—of the Holocaust. Carr conducted three incredibly revealing interviews with: (1) a Black female Holocaust victim; (2) the Black commanding officer who liberated 8,000 Black men from a concentration camp; and (3) an African American medic from the all-Black medical unit that was responsible for retrieving thousands of dead bodies from Dachau. (White medical units were spared the gruesome task.) "Kay," the Black female Holocaust survivor, laments: "You cannot possibly comprehend the anger I have in me because of being experimented on in Dachau, and being called ‘nigger girl’ and ‘blacky’ while growing up." Testimonials from the Black commanding officer and African American medic are memorialized, for the first time ever, in Carr’s book. The research is based on voluminous documentation, and more. If you are like most people, you simply have never heard the unbelievable story of Black victims of the Holocaust. You are invited to read about the human spirit's triumph over events that occurred during this horrible piece of hidden history.

State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda

State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda

A history of Nazi propaganda based on never-before-published posters, rare photographs, and historical artifacts from the USHMM’s groundbreaking exhibition. “Propaganda,” Adolf Hitler wrote in 1924, “is a truly terrible weapon in the hands of an expert.” State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda documents how, in the 1920s and 1930s, the Nazi Party used posters, newspapers, rallies, and the new technologies of radio and film to sway millions with its vision for a new Germany—reinforced by fear-mongering images of state “enemies.” These images promoted indifference toward the suffering of neighbors, disguised the regime’s genocidal actions, and insidiously incited ordinary people to carry out or tolerate mass violence.The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum is addressing this topic today because, in an age of instant electronic communication, disseminators of messages and images of intolerance and hate have new tools, while at the same time consumers seem less able to cope with the vast amounts of unmediated information bombarding them daily. It is hoped that a deeper understanding of the complexities of the past may help us respond more effectively to today’s propaganda campaigns and biased messages.230 illustrations

Yamashita's Ghost: War Crimes, MacArthur's Justice, and Command Accountability (Modern War Studies)

Yamashita's Ghost: War Crimes, MacArthur's Justice, and Command Accountability (Modern War Studies)

"I don't blame my executioners. I will pray God bless them."So said General Tomoyuki Yamashita, Japan's most accomplished military commander, as he stood on the scaffold in Manila in 1946. His stoic dignity typified the man his U.S. Army defense lawyers had come to deeply respect in the first war crimes trial of World War II. Moments later, he was dead. But had justice been served? Allan A. Ryan reopens the case against Yamashita to illuminate crucial questions and controversies that have surrounded his trial and conviction, but also to deepen our understanding of broader contemporary issues—especially the limits of command accountability.The atrocities of 1944 and 1945 in the Philippines—rape, murder, torture, beheadings, and starvation, the victims often women and children—were horrific. They were committed by Japanese troops as General Douglas MacArthur's army tried to recapture the islands. Yamashita commanded Japan's dispersed and besieged Philippine forces in that final year of the war. But the prosecution conceded that he had neither ordered nor committed these crimes. MacArthur charged him, instead, with the crime—if it was one—of having "failed to control" his troops, and convened a military commission of five American generals, none of them trained in the law. It was the first prosecution in history of a military commander on such a charge. In a turbulent and disturbing trial marked by disregard of the Army's own rules, the generals delivered the verdict they knew MacArthur wanted. Yamashita's lawyers appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court, whose controversial decision upheld the conviction over the passionate dissents of two justices who invoked, for the first time in U.S. legal history, the concept of international human rights.Drawing from the tribunal's transcripts, Ryan vividly chronicles this tragic tale and its personalities. His trenchant analysis of the case's lingering question—should a commander be held accountable for the crimes of his troops, even if he has no knowledge of them—has profound implications for all military commanders.

Jewish Women and Their Salons: The Power of Conversation (Published in Association with the Jewish Museum, New York S)

Jewish Women and Their Salons: The Power of Conversation (Published in Association with the Jewish Museum, New York S)

From their debut in Berlin in the 1780s to their emergence in 1930s California, Jewish women’s salons served as welcoming havens where all classes and creeds could openly debate art, music, literature, and politics. This fascinating book is the first to explore the history of these salons where remarkable women of intellect resolved that neither gender nor religion would impede their ability to bring about social change.Emily D. Bilski and Emily Braun examine the lives of more than a dozen Jewish salonières, charting the evolution of the salon over time and among cultures, in cities including Berlin, Vienna, Paris, London, New York, and Milan. They show how each woman uniquely adapted the salon to suit her own interests while maintaining the salon’s key characteristics of basic informality and a diversity of guests. Other distinguished contributors to the volume discuss in detail the Berlin salons of the 1800s; the salon in terms of Jewish acculturation and its relation to gender and music; and the relations of Marcel Proust, Oscar Wilde, and Gertrude Stein to the literary salon. The book is enriched with a lavish array of illustrations, including documentary photographs, paintings, drawings, prints, and decorative arts.

Holocaust Film: The Political Aesthetics of Ideology

Holocaust Film: The Political Aesthetics of Ideology

This timely new monograph takes as its starting point the provocative contention that Holocaust film scholarship has been marginalized academically despite the crucial role Holocaust film has played in fostering international awareness of the Nazi genocide and scholarly understandings of cinematic power. The book suggests political and economic motivations for this seeming paradox, the ideological parameters of which are evident in debates and controversies over Holocaust films themselves, and around Holocaust culture in general. Lending particular attention to four exemplary Holocaust art films (Korczak [Poland, 1990], The Quarrel [Canada, 1990], Entre Nous [France, 1983], and Balagan [Germany, 1994]), this book breaks disciplinary ground by drawing critical connections between public and scholarly debates over Holocaust representation, and the often sophisticated cinematic structures lending aesthetic shape to them in today s global arena. 'Groundbreaking, challenging, judicious, theoretically ambitious, and analytically lucid, Terri Ginsberg's Holocaust Film: The Political Aesthetics of Ideology begins from the ground zero of the unspeakable and works its way meticulously up towards the long shot of a take that will remain definitive to generations of scholarship it anticipates.' Hamid Dabashi, Columbia University What Norman Finkelstein has done in exposing the political foregrounding of the Holocaust Industry, what Giorgio Agamben has done in extrapolating the contemporary implications of homo sacer from the horrors of the concentration camps, Terri Ginsberg is doing with astonishing command and competence about Holocaust cinema. Ginsberg s voice is clear, concise, liberating, and the harbinger of an entire new generation of scholarship in cinema studies. Groundbreaking, challenging, judicious, theoretically ambitious, and analytically lucid, Holocaust Film: The Political Aesthetics of Ideology begins from the ground zero of the unspeakable and works its way meticulously up towards the long shot of a take that will remain definitive to generations of scholarship it anticipates. Hamid Dabashi, Columbia University; Editor, Dreams of a Nation: On Palestinian Cinema Terri Ginsberg's Holocaust Film: The Political Aesthetics of Ideology is a much needed intervention in the field of Holocaust Studies in general and in Holocaust Cinema Studies in particular. What Ginsberg has fashioned is a reading of the Holocaust that is both immanent and materialist and much needed in these times when Holocaust scholarship is being shanghaighed by both ends of the political spectrum. It is Ginsberg's achievement that Holocaust cinematic texts are here restored to their historical moment in a way that must be accomplished if there is ever to be an understanding of how these texts might grasp the original moment of the tragedy. Her painstakingly thorough scholarship and theoretical rigor ensures that her work at least will not serve to promote the type of easy, knee-jerk response that simply adds flame to the fire and in the name of scholarship contributes to the perpetuation of other tragedies in the present Israeli Palestinian situation. Dennis Broe, Graduate Program Coordinator, Media Arts Department, Long Island University Ginsberg ably demonstrates how the subgenre known as Holocaust cinema has been co-opted by the culture industry. Bypassing the usual Hollywood touchstones, she focuses on four relatively neglected films that illuminate several key motifs that permeate many films on the subject: the Christianization of Jewish oppression, the commodification of genocide by both commercial and art house cinema, and the ethnocentric appropriation of the Holocaust by filmmakers with reactionary agendas. Eschewing the conformist platitudes of previous studies, Ginsberg s book

European Identity and the Second World War

European Identity and the Second World War

The two concepts at the centre of this book: Europe, and the Second World War, are constantly changing in public perception. Now that 'Europe' is an even more contested idea than ever, this volume informs the current discourse on European identity by analysing Europe's reaction to the tragedy, heroism and disgrace of the Second World War.

Where We Were in Vietnam: A Comprehensive Guide to the Firebases and Militar

Where We Were in Vietnam: A Comprehensive Guide to the Firebases and Militar

Widely considered the definitive resource on the Vietnam War, Where We Were identifies the name, location and provides a brief historical synopsis of every military installation, firebase, landing zone, airfield, port, signal site, vessel and significant terrain feature of the American war in Vietnam. Additionally, includes a substantial number from the French War as well. Coverage includes all of Indochina. Currently features over 12,000 entries. Also includes an extensive appendix of Vietnam War research and map guidelines/resources.