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The Imperial Screen: Japanese Film Culture in the Fifteen Years' War, 1931-1945 (Wisconsin Studies in Film)

The Imperial Screen: Japanese Film Culture in the Fifteen Years' War, 1931-1945 (Wisconsin Studies in Film)

From the late 1920s through World War II, film became a crucial tool in the state of Japan. Detailing the way Japanese directors, scriptwriters, company officials, and bureaucrats colluded to produce films that supported the war effort, The Imperial Screen is a highly-readable account of the realities of cultural life in wartime Japan. Widely hailed as "epoch-making" by the Japanese press, it presents the most comprehensive survey yet published of "national policy" films, relating their montage and dramatic structures to the cultural currents, government policies, and propaganda goals of the era. Peter B. High’s treatment of the Japanese film world as a microcosm of the entire sphere of Japanese wartime culture demonstrates what happens when conscientious artists and intellectuals become enmeshed in a totalitarian regime.

Barred: The Shameful Refusal of FDR's State Department to Save Tens of Thousands of Europe's Jews from Extermination

Barred: The Shameful Refusal of FDR's State Department to Save Tens of Thousands of Europe's Jews from Extermination

Live the exciting Holocaust story of heroes, Jewish and Gentile, who risked everything sneaking into and out of concentration camps and the Warsaw Ghetto to bring the news of the slaughter. Go inside the State Department to experience American bureaucrats, knowing of the mass murders of Jews, nevertheless prevented Jewish immigration and concealed, downplayed or outright denied what they knew was happening while the President, for political reasons, did nothing.Visit: www.carlsteinhouse.com; contact: stein0216@swfla.rr.com

How We Lived Then: A History of Everyday Life During the Second World War

How We Lived Then: A History of Everyday Life During the Second World War

Compiled by the historical adviser to the TV series "The 1940s House," this is an engagingly written social chronicle of wartime civilian life in England from September 1939 to August 1945—from the grandeurs of the Blitz to the miseries of dried egg powder—with numerous individual testimonies.

Bodies in the Bog and the Archaeological Imagination

Bodies in the Bog and the Archaeological Imagination

Over the past few centuries, northern Europe’s bogs have yielded mummified men, women, and children who were deposited there as sacrifices in the early Iron Age and kept startlingly intact by the chemical properties of peat. In this remarkable account of their modern afterlives, Karin Sanders argues that the discovery of bog bodies began an extraordinary—and ongoing—cultural journey.            Throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, Sanders shows, these eerily preserved remains came alive in art and science as material metaphors for such concepts as trauma, nostalgia, and identity. Sigmund Freud, Joseph Beuys, Seamus Heaney, and other major figures have used them to reconsider fundamental philosophical, literary, aesthetic, and scientific concerns. Exploring this intellectual spectrum, Sanders contends that the power of bog bodies to provoke such a wide range of responses is rooted in their unique status as both archeological artifacts and human beings. They emerge as corporeal time capsules that transcend archaeology to challenge our assumptions about what we can know about the past. By restoring them to the roster of cultural phenomena that force us to confront our ethical and aesthetic boundaries, Bodies in the Bog excavates anew the question of what it means to be human.

Justifying the Obligation to Die: War, Ethics, and Political Obligation with Illustrations from Zionism

Justifying the Obligation to Die: War, Ethics, and Political Obligation with Illustrations from Zionism

One of the state's key features is its ability to oblige its citizens to risk their lives on its behalf by being sent into war. However, what is it about the state (or its equivalent) that makes this obligation justifiable? Justifying the Obligation to Die is the first monograph to explore systematically how this obligation has been justified. Using key texts from political philosophy and just war theory, it provides a critical survey of how this obligation has been justified and, using illustrations from Zionist thought and practice, demonstrates how the various arguments for the obligation have functioned. The obligation to risk one's life for the state is often presumed by theorists and practitioners who take the state for granted, but for the Zionists, a people without a state but in search of one and who have little history of state-based political thought, it became necessary to explain this obligation. As such, this book examines Zionism as a Jewish political theory, reading it alongside the tradition of Western political thought, and critiques how Zionist thought and practice sought to justify this obligation to risk one's life in war—what Michael Walzer termed "the obligation to die." Finally, turning to the political thought of Hannah Arendt, the author suggests how the obligation could become justifiable, although never entirely justified. For the obligation to become at all justifiable, the type of politics that the state enables must respect human diversity and individuality and restrict violence so that violence is not a continuation of politics.

We Refused to Die: My time as a prisoner of war in Bataan and Japan, 1942-1945

We Refused to Die: My time as a prisoner of war in Bataan and Japan, 1942-1945

Gene Jacobsen was a nineteen-year-old Idaho ranch kid when he decided to join the Army Air Corps in September 1940. By December 1941 he was supply sergeant for the Twentieth Pursuit Squadron at Clark Field in the Philippines. Five months later he was a captive of the Imperial Japanese Army, enduring the Bataan death march and subsequent horrors in the Philippines and Japan. Of the 207 officers and men who made up Jacobsen’s squadron at the beginning of the war, sixty-five survived to return to the United States. We Refused to Die recounts Jacobsen’s struggle, against all odds, to remain one of those sixty-five men.In engaging, direct prose, Jacobsen’s three-and-a-half year experience as a prisoner of war takes the reader on a brutal and harrowing march through hatred and forgiveness, fortitude and freedom. We Refused to Die is an honest memoir that shines light on one of history’s darkest moments.

Capitulations of the Ottoman Empire

Capitulations of the Ottoman Empire

Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.

The Cambridge History of War: Volume 4, War and the Modern World

The Cambridge History of War: Volume 4, War and the Modern World

Volume IV of The Cambridge History of War offers a definitive new account of war in the most destructive period in human history. Opening with the massive conflicts that erupted in the mid-nineteenth century in the US, Asia and Europe, leading historians trace the global evolution of warfare through 'the age of mass', 'the age of machine', and 'the age of management'. They explore how industrialization and nationalism fostered vast armies whilst the emergence of mobile warfare and improved communications systems made possible the 'total warfare' of the two World Wars. With military conflict regionalized after 1945 they show how guerrilla and asymmetrical warfare highlighted the limits of the machine and mass as well as the importance of the media in winning 'hearts and minds'. This is a comprehensive guide to every facet of modern war from strategy and operations to its social, cultural, technological and political contexts and legacies.

Voices from Captivity: Interpreteting the American POW Narrative (Modern War Studies)

Voices from Captivity: Interpreteting the American POW Narrative (Modern War Studies)

Popularized by books and films like Andersonville, The Great Escape, and The Hanoi Hilton, and recounted in innumerable postwar memoirs, the POW story holds a special place in American culture. Robert Doyle's remarkable study shows why it has retained such enormous power to move and instruct us. Long after wartime, memories of captivity haunt former wartime prisoners, their families, and their society-witness the continuing Vietnam MIA-POW controversies-and raise fundamental questions about human nature and survival under inhumane conditions. The prison landscapes have varied dramatically: Indian villages during the Forest Wars; floating hulks during the Revolution and War of 1812; slave bagnios in Algeria and Tripoli; hotels and haciendas during the Mexican War; large rural camps like Andersonville in the South or converted federal armories like Elmira in the North; stalags in Germany and death-ridden tropical camps in the Philippines; frozen jails in North Korea; and the "Hanoi Hilton" and bamboo prisons of Vietnam. But, as Doyle demonstrates, the story remains the same. Doyle shows that, though setting and circumstance may change, POW stories share a common structure and are driven by similar themes. Capture, incarceration, isolation, propaganda, torture, capitulation or resistance, death, spiritual quest, escape, liberation, and repatriation are recurrent key motifs in these narratives. It is precisely these elements, Doyle contends, that have made this genre such a fascinating and enduring literary form. Drawing from a wide array of sources, including official documents, first-person accounts, histories, and personal letters, in addition to folklore and fiction, Doyle illustrates the timelessness of the POW story and shows why it has become central to our understanding of the American experience of war.

Honor's Reward: How to Attract God's Favor and Blessing

Honor's Reward: How to Attract God's Favor and Blessing

In HONOR'S REWARD, bestselling author John Bevere unveils the power and truth of an often-overlooked principle-the spiritual law of honor. Bevere explains that understanding the vital role of this virtue will enable readers to attract blessing both now and for eternity.

Civil War High Commands

Civil War High Commands

Based on nearly five decades of research, this magisterial work is a biographical register and analysis of the people who most directly influenced the course of the Civil War, its high commanders. Numbering 3,396, they include the presidents and their cabinet members, state governors, general officers of the Union and Confederate armies (regular, provisional, volunteers, and militia), and admirals and commodores of the two navies. Civil War High Commands will become a cornerstone reference work on these personalities and the meaning of their commands, and on the Civil War itself.Errors of fact and interpretation concerning the high commanders are legion in the Civil War literature, in reference works as well as in narrative accounts. The present work brings together for the first time in one volume the most reliable facts available, drawn from more than 1,000 sources and including the most recent research. The biographical entries include complete names, birthplaces, important relatives, education, vocations, publications, military grades, wartime assignments, wounds, captures, exchanges, paroles, honors, and place of death and interment.In addition to its main component, the biographies, the volume also includes a number of essays, tables, and synopses designed to clarify previously obscure matters such as the definition of grades and ranks; the difference between commissions in regular, provisional, volunteer, and militia services; the chronology of military laws and executive decisions before, during, and after the war; and the geographical breakdown of command structures. The book is illustrated with 84 new diagrams of all the insignias used throughout the war and with 129 portraits of the most important high commanders.

Another Vietnam: Pictures of the War from the Other Side

Another Vietnam: Pictures of the War from the Other Side

Since the end of the war over 25 years ago, Vietnam has haunted America. Today, many people remember the war as a series of terrible pictures - taken by courageous civilian and military photographers. But there are other images of the war that we have rarely seen. These are the pictures taken by the other side, the Vietnamese, the enemy. Pictures of a peasant people fighting the most powerful nation on earth - and finally defeating it. In this book, we meet the Vietnamese soldier-photographers who risked their lives to capture their country's struggle in evocative, stunning images. For them, photography was a weapon used to win the war. Nine out of ten Vietnamese photographers were taken by bullets, bombs, dysentery, and malaria. Page returns to understand the spirit and dedication of these men, and to commemorate the sacrifice and loss of both sides. This is a new visual record of the war whose images have become so familiar. Through interviews with these photographers, and through their surprising images, a fresh per-spective emerges on the most troubling and divisive foreign war ever fought by the United States.

Britain and America After World War II: Bilateral Relations and the Beginnings of the Cold War (International Library of Twentieth Century History)

Britain and America After World War II: Bilateral Relations and the Beginnings of the Cold War (International Library of Twentieth Century History)

The period immediately after World War II was a vital one for diplomatic relations and, with the Soviet Union emerging as a new superpower, it was particularly important for Britain's relations with America. This is the first book to focus on the role of the British Embassy in Washington during this period. According to Richard Wevill, the British Embassy was pivotal in the fulfillment of key British foreign, financial and imperial policy objectives. Applying the implications of new archival material to the turning points of the period, including a detailed review of Lord Halifax's ambassadorship under Attlee, a re-evaluation of the part of Roger Makins in the atomic energy discussions, and the Embassy's influence in relation to Palestine, Wevill argues for a more nuanced understanding of the 'special relationship' in its most formative period. He offers a recasting of a crucial period of twentieth century history, providing fascinating new detail on Britain's relations with President Truman as well as with Secretaries of State George Marshall and Dean Acheson. Charting the beginnings of one of modern history's most influential alliances, this book will be a primary reference point for students and scholars of History, the Cold War, Politics and International Relations.

American Night: The Literary Left in the Era of the Cold War

American Night: The Literary Left in the Era of the Cold War

American Night, the final volume of an unprecedented trilogy, brings Alan Wald's multigenerational history of Communist writers to a poignant climax. Using new research to explore the intimate lives of novelists, poets, and critics during the Cold War, Wald reveals a radical community longing for the rebirth of the social vision of the 1930s and struggling with a loss of moral certainty as the Communist worldview was being called into question. The resulting literature, Wald shows, is a haunting record of fracture and struggle linked by common structures of feeling, ones more suggestive of the "negative dialectics" of Theodor Adorno than the traditional social realism of the Left. Establishing new points of contact among Kenneth Fearing, Ann Petry, Alexander Saxton, Richard Wright, Jo Sinclair, Thomas McGrath, and Carlos Bulosan, Wald argues that these writers were in dialogue with psychoanalysis, existentialism, and postwar modernism, often generating moods of piercing emotional acuity and cosmic dissent. He also recounts the contributions of lesser known cultural workers, with a unique accent on gays and lesbians, secular Jews, and people of color. The vexing ambiguities of an era Wald labels "late antifascism" serve to frame an impressive collective biography.

Documentary History of the First Federal Congress of the United States of America, March 4, 1789-March 3, 1791: Petition Histories: Revolutionary War-Related Claims (Volume 7)

Documentary History of the First Federal Congress of the United States of America, March 4, 1789-March 3, 1791: Petition Histories: Revolutionary War-Related Claims (Volume 7)

Volume VII presents the histories and documentary record of over 400 Revolutionary War-related petitions presented to the First Federal Congress. The documents reveal much about the official reaction towards the plight of those who suffered to secure independence, but they also tell the fascinating stories of individual soldiers.

Stickball and Egg Creams: A Bronx Boy's Memoir

Stickball and Egg Creams: A Bronx Boy's Memoir

Although the streets of the Bronx in New York were not paved with gold, the 1940s and 1950s were the golden years for author Eugene Racond. In this personal memoir, he shares his experiences and what it was like growing up in that era in this special borough. Now in his mid-seventies, Racond chronicles his life from childhood to adolescence. Written with humor and heart, Stickball and Egg Creams provides a glimpse into this special time in America. From vacations in the Jewish Catskills, to his escapades sneaking cigarettes, excursions to Coney Island, and stickball games with friends, this narrative provides a nostalgic look at the 1940s and '50s. In addition, Racond recounts his family's hardships in Poland and Russia, their arrival from Europe, and their strong will to succeed in the United States. Racond shares his oftentimes humorous views on modern society and politics in Stickball and Egg Creams. But more than anything, this heartwarming memoir portrays the feeling that growing up in the Bronx was something to be proud of.

Loyal Forces: The American Animals of World War II

Loyal Forces: The American Animals of World War II

During World War II, the U.S. called upon all its citizens to contribute to the war effort, encouraging them to enlist, buy war bonds, and collect scrap metal. The use of American animals during the conflict further demonstrates the resourcefulness of the U.S. military and the many sacrifices that led to the Allies victory. Through 157 photographs from the National World War II Museum collection, Loyal Forces captures the heroism, hard work, and innate skills of innumerable animals that aided the troops as they fought to protect, transport, communicate, and sustain morale. From the last mounted cavalry charge of the U.S. Army to the 36,000 homing pigeons deployed overseas, service animals made a significant impact on military operations during World War II. Authors Toni M. Kiser and Lindsey F. Barnes deftly illustrate that every branch of the armed forces and every theater of the war including the home front utilized the instincts and dexterity of these dependable creatures, who, though not always in the direct line of enemy fire, had their lives put at risk for the jobs they performed.

Dachau, Holocaust, and US Samurais: Nisei Soldiers First in Dachau?

Dachau, Holocaust, and US Samurais: Nisei Soldiers First in Dachau?

Well known historian, Pierre Moulin, published successively "US Samourais en Lorraine", "Chronicle of Bruyeres-in-Vosges" in French, "50th anniversary of the liberation of Vosges", "US Samurais in Bruyeres" in French and English and many others. He was made honorary citizen of Hawaii, San Antonio Texas and Fresno California. On the summary of this historical and pictorial book (295 pictures), you will find the true story of Dachau from 1933 to nowadays. For the first time, the real role played in the liberation of the death camp's prisoners by the Japanese American Unit, the 522nd Field Artillery. The Holocaust with all its horror shows the "Jewish Final Solution". The survivors of the Shoa, the Righteous Among the nations and for the first time published, the story of the diplomats saving Jews in Visas for Life. More than 60 years ago, on April 29th, 1945, Dachau was liberated and the entire world was in shock in front of this unbelievable reality. Today, the young generation doesn't even known the name of Hitler! This book is for them and their parents to keep the story alive. Their world is bristling with traps and we would be responsible if we don't prepare them as best as we could. To inform our children is our duty. We have to remain vigilant and prove again and again those facts happened. This bloody page of "inhumanity" should not be forgotten. Wishing the men took the lesson of the History, the last words of this book, were "Never Again", but...Dachau, Holocaust and U.S. Samurais is a non-fiction telling the story of the Holocaust (the Final Solution of the Jewish question) and especially the history of the first Nazi concentration camp (Dachau) from 1933 to 1945 222 pages in pictures. The role played at the liberation by the Samurais of the 522nd Field Artillery battalion of the US Army composed exclusively by Americans of Japanese Ancestry who came from Concentration camps in the USA. The statistics of the Holocaust but also the story of the Righteous Amo