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From Fort Marion to Fort Sill: A Documentary History of the Chiricahua Apache Prisoners of War, 1886-1913

From Fort Marion to Fort Sill: A Documentary History of the Chiricahua Apache Prisoners of War, 1886-1913

From 1886 to 1913, hundreds of Chiricahua Apache men, women, and children lived and died as prisoners of war in Florida, Alabama, and Oklahoma. Their names, faces, and lives have long been forgotten by history, and for nearly one hundred years these individuals have been nothing more than statistics in the history of the United States’ tumultuous war against the Chiricahua Apache.Based on extensive archival research, From Fort Marion to Fort Sill offers long-overdue documentation of the lives and fate of many of these people. This outstanding reference work provides individual biographies for hundreds of the Chiricahua Apache prisoners of war, including those originally classified as POWs in 1886, infants who lived only a few days, children removed from families and sent to Indian boarding schools, and second-generation POWs who lived well into the twenty-first century. Their biographies are often poignant and revealing, and more than 60 previously unpublished photographs give a further glimpse of their humanity.This masterful documentary work, based on the unpublished research notes of former Fort Sill historian Gillett Griswold, at last brings to light the lives and experiences of hundreds of Chiricahua Apaches whose story has gone untold for too long.

In Love and War: The Story of a Family's Ordeal and Sacrifice During the Vietnam Years, Revised and Updated

In Love and War: The Story of a Family's Ordeal and Sacrifice During the Vietnam Years, Revised and Updated

A unique American chronicle of a navy family's life during the Vietnam war years, this widely acclaimed memoir has been updated to include an outspoken account of the Stockdale's experiences in the seventeen years since Jim's release from a Hanoi prison.

HIROSHIMA: Three Photo-panoramas of the Destroyed City, October 1945

HIROSHIMA: Three Photo-panoramas of the Destroyed City, October 1945

Originally published as the supplement to ASIN: B000QBPZX0, "Atomic Bomb Documents Hiroshima" Out of print since 1975, through special arrangement with the original publisher in Japan, we have made available again the three photo-panoramas of the destroyed city of Hiroshima. This is a not-for-profit project created for education about the effects of nuclear war. All panoramas are on heavy chart paper and folded, each about 8 feet long. The panoramas show the physical effects of a small (16 kiloton) nuclear weapon on a city of 400,000. Japanese and English text in the photo border indicates significant landmarks. This is a remarkable photo-record of an extraordinary historical event. Displayed, they should provoke serious thought from students and adults. All three of the charts photographically sweep over the entire 360 degree panorama of the destroyed city. They are a devastating comment on the effects of a small nuclear weapon. 1. NEAR SHIMA HOSPITAL (Ground level from the hypocenter) by U.S. Research Group. Almost 360 degrees, Paper: 13.75" X 91.5"; Photo: 10.25" X 89.25" 2. FROM THE (roof top) FORMER CHUGOKU SHIMBUN BLDG. by Shigeo Hayashi; 360 degrees, Paper: 13.75" X 106.6"; Photo: 10.25" X 104.5" 3. FROM THE (roof top) HIROSHIMA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BLDG. by Shigeo Hayashi; 360 degrees, Paper: 13.75" X 106.5"; Photo: 8.1" X 102.4"

The Art of Gaman: Arts and Crafts from the Japanese American Internment Camps 1942-1946

The Art of Gaman: Arts and Crafts from the Japanese American Internment Camps 1942-1946

In 1942, Executive Order 9066 mandated the incarceration of 110,000 Japanese Americans, including men, women, children, the elderly, and the infirm, for the duration of the war. Allowed only what they could carry, they were given just a few days to settle their affairs and report to assembly centers. Businesses were lost, personal property was stolen or vandalized, and lives were shattered. The Japanese word gaman means "enduring what seems unbearable with dignity and grace. "Imprisoned in remote camps surrounded by barbed wire and guarded by soldiers with machine guns, the internees sought courage and solace in art. Using found materials at first and later what they could order by catalog, they whittled and carved, painted and etched, stitched and crocheted. What they created is a celebration of the nobility of the human spirit under adversity. THE ART OF GAMAN presents more than 150 examples of art created by internees, along with a history of the camps.Reviews". . . demonstrates the poignancy of the internment experience and the strength of the human spirit."-Alaska Airlines MagazineFrom the Hardcover edition.

Patriotism (Nelson-Hall Series in Psychology)

Patriotism (Nelson-Hall Series in Psychology)

In this collected volume, psychologists, sociologists, philosophers, a political scientist, and an historian she light on the phenomenon of patriotism. In spite of the great power of patriotism, social scientists have directed very little attention to its study. PATRIOTISM fills this gap and creates an approach to study this important topic. This is a book of political psychology that examines patriotism's origins and history, theories of development, and functions and roles in individual and group life. Although the authors are guided by different disciplinary traditions and perspectives, the book provides a systemic, coherent analysis of patriotism.

Honor, Patronage, Kinship & Purity: Unlocking New Testament Culture

Honor, Patronage, Kinship & Purity: Unlocking New Testament Culture

Contemporary Western readers may find it surprising that honor and shame, patronage and reciprocity, kinship and family, and purity and pollution offer us keys to interpreting the New Testament. But as recent scholarship has proposed and as David deSilva demonstrates, paying attention to these cultural themes opens our eyes and ears to new discoveries and deeper understanding. Through our understanding of honor and shame in the Mediterranean world, we gain new appreciation of the way in which the personhood of early Christians connected with group values. By examining the protocols of patronage and reciprocity, we more firmly grasp the meaning of God's grace--and our response has fresh meaning. In exploring the ethos of kinship and household relations, we enlarge our perspective on the early Christian communities that met in houses and functioned as a new family or "household" of God. And by investigating the notions of purity and pollution along with their associated practices, we come to realize how the ancient "map" of society and the world was revised by the power of the gospel. DeSilva's work will reward you with a deeper appreciation of the New Testament, the gospel and Christian discipleship. More than that, it will also inform your participation in contemporary Christian community.

Handbook of Military Social Work

Handbook of Military Social Work

The need has never been more crucial for community health providers, programs, and organizations to have access to training in addressing the unique behavioral health challenges facing our veterans, active duty military, and their families. Handbook of Military Social Work is edited by renowned leaders in the field, with contributions from social work professionals drawing from their wealth of experience working with veterans, active duty military, and their families. Handbook of Military Social Work considers: Military culture and diversity Women in the military Posttraumatic stress disorder in veterans Traumatic brain injury in the military Suicide in the military Homelessness among veterans Cycles of deployment and family well-being Grief, loss, and bereavement in military families Interventions for military children and youth Offering thoughtful advice covering the spectrum of issues encountered by mental health professionals working with individuals and families, Handbook of Military Social Work will contribute to the improvement of efforts to help our military personnel, veterans, and their families deal with the challenges they face.

Military Bounty Land, 1776-1855

Military Bounty Land, 1776-1855

Bounty land was awarded to those who served in the wars from 1776, with the last act granting this reward passed in 1855. During this period millions of acres were awarded by the government. A multitude of records were generated, many of them providing important family information which family historians will be eager to locate. This guidebook explains what records are available, how to locate them, and includes an appendix of the important laws which generated the awards.

Loyal Forces: The American Animals of World War II

Loyal Forces: The American Animals of World War II

During World War II, the U.S. called upon all its citizens to contribute to the war effort, encouraging them to enlist, buy war bonds, and collect scrap metal. The use of American animals during the conflict further demonstrates the resourcefulness of the U.S. military and the many sacrifices that led to the Allies victory. Through 157 photographs from the National World War II Museum collection, Loyal Forces captures the heroism, hard work, and innate skills of innumerable animals that aided the troops as they fought to protect, transport, communicate, and sustain morale. From the last mounted cavalry charge of the U.S. Army to the 36,000 homing pigeons deployed overseas, service animals made a significant impact on military operations during World War II. Authors Toni M. Kiser and Lindsey F. Barnes deftly illustrate that every branch of the armed forces and every theater of the war including the home front utilized the instincts and dexterity of these dependable creatures, who, though not always in the direct line of enemy fire, had their lives put at risk for the jobs they performed.

Rehabilitating Bodies: Health, History, and the American Civil War

Rehabilitating Bodies: Health, History, and the American Civil War

The American Civil War is one of the most documented, romanticized, and perennially reenacted events in American history. In Rehabilitating Bodies: Health, History, and the American Civil War, Lisa A. Long charts how its extreme carnage dictated the Civil War's development into a lasting trope that expresses not only altered social, economic, and national relationships but also an emergent self-consciousness. Looking to a wide range of literary, medical, and historical texts, she explores how they insist on the intimate relationship between the war and a variety of invisible wounds, illnesses, and infirmities that beset Americans throughout the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and plague us still today.Long shows how efforts to narrate credibly the many and sometimes illusory sensations elicited by the Civil War led writers to the modern discourses of health and history, which are premised on the existence of a corporeal and often critical reality that practitioners cannot know fully yet believe in nevertheless. Professional thinkers and doers both literally and figuratively sought to rehabilitate—to reclothe, normalize, and stabilize—Civil War bodies and the stories that accounted for them.Taking a fresh look at the work of canonical war writers such as Louisa May Alcott and Stephen Crane while examining anew public records, journalism, and medical writing, Long brings the study of the Civil War into conversation with recent critical work on bodily ontology and epistemology and theories of narrative and history.

Vietnam War Nurses: Personal Accounts of 18 Americans

Vietnam War Nurses: Personal Accounts of 18 Americans

Eighteen nurses who served in the United States military nurse corps during the Vietnam War present their personal accounts in this book. They represent all military branches and both genders. They served in the theater of combat, in the United States, and in countries allied with the U.S. They served in front line hospitals, hospital ships, large medical centers and small clinics. They speak of caring for casualties during a conflict filled with controversy--and of patriotism, of the nursing profession and of travel and the adventure of friendship and love.

Alliance of the Colored Peoples: Ethiopia and Japan before World War II

Alliance of the Colored Peoples: Ethiopia and Japan before World War II

With the Japanese posing as the leader of the world's colored peoples before World War II, many Ethiopians turned to Japan for inspiration. By offering them commercial opportunities, by seeking their military support, and by reaching out to popular Japanese opinion, Ethiopians tried to soften the stark reality of a stronger Italy encroaching on their country. Europeans feared Japan's growing economic and political influence in the colonial world. Jealously guarding its claimed rights in Ethiopia against all comers, among Italy's reasons for going to war was the perceived need to blunt Japan's commercial and military advances into Northeast Africa. Meanwhile, throughout 1934 and the summer of 1935, Moscow worked hard and in ways contrary to its claimed ideological imperatives to make Collective Security work. Ethiopia was a small price to pay Italy for cooperation against Nazi Germany in Austria and Imperial Japan in China. 'Yellow' Japanese and 'black' Ethiopian collaboration before the war illuminates the pernicious and flexible use of race in international diplomacy. In odious terms, Italians used race to justify their actions as defending western and 'white' civilization. The Japanese used race to explain their tilt toward Ethiopia. The Soviets used race to justify their support for Italy until late 1935. Ethiopia used race to attract help, and 'colored' peoples worldwide rallied to Ethiopia's call. J. Calvitt Clarke III is Professor Emeritus of History at Jacksonville University, Florida.

Too Deep Were Our Roots: A Viennese Jewish memoir of the years between the two world wars

Too Deep Were Our Roots: A Viennese Jewish memoir of the years between the two world wars

Born just before World War I, Sonia Wachstein's earliest memories of her childhood in Vienna revolve around her family's house looking out over the peaceful Vienna Woods. She also recalls a post-war time of rampant inflation and unemployment. Long an intellectual and cultural capital, the city was also a place where the well-established Jewish community prospered. But as the European political situation changed during the 1920s and 1930s, life for the assimilated Jews in Vienna began to change. Propelled by the rise of the Nazi party in Germany, and later by the Nuremberg laws, Sonia's family and friends face increasing discrimination. Her travels to England, Italy, and Palestine-where there is little mention of the "Jewish problem"-underscore the dangers of ingrained anti-Semitism. When Austria is occupied by the German army in 1938, Sonia faces the tough choice of deciding whether to stay or leave-before it is too late to do so. This riveting first-person account includes the stories of Bernhard Wachstein, Sonia's father, a prominent Jewish scholar; her brother Max, a doctor who is sent to Dachau; and many other friends and family members. And woven throughout are the themes of roots and identity, and the stark question: "what is to be done when homeland is no longer home?" 69 illustrations.

Ethnic Patriotism and the East African Revival: A History of Dissent, c.1935-1972 (African Studies)

Ethnic Patriotism and the East African Revival: A History of Dissent, c.1935-1972 (African Studies)

Ethnic Patriotism and the East African Revival shows how, in the era of African political independence, cosmopolitan Christian converts struggled with east Africa's patriots over the definition of culture and community. The book traces the history of the East African Revival, an evangelical movement that spread through much of eastern and central Africa. Its converts offered a subversive reading of culture, disavowing their compatriots and disregarding their obligations to kin. They earned the ire of east Africa's patriots, who worked to root people in place as inheritors of ancestral wisdom. This book casts religious conversion in a new light: not as an inward reorientation of belief, but as a political action that opened up novel paths of self-narration and unsettled the inventions of tradition.

Living On: Portraits of Tennessee Survivors and Liberators

Living On: Portraits of Tennessee Survivors and Liberators

Living On is a documentary project that includes portraits of survivors, liberators, U. S. Army witnesses, hidden children, and refugees from the Holocaust now living in Tennessee. These individuals lived through one of the most catastrophic periods in human history. They are witnesses to horrific events that have defied human imagination, then and now. Their stories, faces, and voices provide separate testimony into how the unthinkable happened and how its consequences created a lasting impact that has relevance today.Each of these courageous individuals was willing to revisit painful memories, telling his or her story in hopes that history might never repeat itself. Through the accounts of Holocaust survivors and liberators included in this book, readers become witnesses to an important and frightening period when government leaders persecuted and killed ordinary citizens because of who they were. Their stories of strength and courage serve as a permanent reminder that nothing can ever extinguish the light of the human spirit.Through the Living On project, the Tennessee Holocaust Commission created a traveling exhibition of photographs and stories that became the basis of this book. Living On gives voice to storytellers whose ability to testify may soon be lost through age and frailty. Living On also offers readers and viewers the opportunity to meet fellow citizens through the medium of photographic portrait and biographical sketch when physical encounters prove impossible. The book stands as a powerful testament to human resiliency in spite of the efforts, inspired by fanatical race hatred, to eliminate the very faces and voices it captures.Living On is a project of the Tennessee Holocaust Commission. For moreinformation on the exhibit, please visit http://www.tennesseeholocaustcommission.org.Robert Heller is an associate professor in the School of Journalism and Electronic Media at the University of Tennessee. He teaches photojournalism and graphic design and is the author of More Than the Game: The Tennessee Football Experience.

The Defining Years of the Dutch East Indies, 1942-1949: Survivors' Accounts of Japanese Invasion and Enslavement of Europeans and the Revolution That

The Defining Years of the Dutch East Indies, 1942-1949: Survivors' Accounts of Japanese Invasion and Enslavement of Europeans and the Revolution That

Following their invasion of Java on March 1, 1942, the Japanese began a process of Japanization of the archipelago, banning every remnant of Dutch rule. Over the next three years, more than 100,000 Dutch citizens were shipped to Japanese internment camps and more than four million romushas, forced Indonesian laborers, were enlisted in the Japanese war effort. The Japanese occupation stimulated the development of Indonesian independence movements. Headed by Sukarno, a longtime admirer of Japan, nationalist forces declared their independence on August 17, 1945. For Dutch citizens, Dutch-Indonesians or "Indos," and pro-Dutch Indonesians, Sukarno's declaration marked the beginning of a new wave of terror. These powerful and often poignant stories from survivors of the Japanese occupation and subsequent turmoil surrounding Indonesian independence provide one with a vivid portrait of the hardships faced during the period.

The Jackson County War: Reconstruction and Resistance in Post-Civil War Florida

The Jackson County War: Reconstruction and Resistance in Post-Civil War Florida

The Jackson County War offers original conclusions explaining why Jackson County became the bloodiest region in Reconstruction Florida and is the first book-length treatment of the subject. From early 1869 through the end of 1871, citizens of Jackson County, Florida, slaughtered their neighbors by the score. The nearly threeyear frenzy of bloodshed became known as the Jackson County War. The killings, close to one hundred and by some estimates twice that number, brought Jackson County the notoriety of being the most violent county in Florida during the Reconstruction era.  Daniel R. Weinfeld has made a thorough investigation of contemporary accounts. He adds an assessment of recently discovered information, and presents a critical evaluation of the standard secondary sources. The Jackson County War focuses on the role of the Freedmen’s Bureau, the emergence of white “Regulators,” and the development of African American political consciousness and leadership. It follows the community’s descent after the Civil War into disorder punctuated by furious outbursts of violence until the county settled into uneasy stability seven years later. The Jackson County War emerges as an emblem of all that could and did go wrong in the uneasy years after Appomattox and that left a residue of hatred and fear that endured for generations.

The Jewish Revolts Against Rome, A.D. 66-135: A Military Analysis

The Jewish Revolts Against Rome, A.D. 66-135: A Military Analysis

During the first and second centuries A.D., the supremacy of the Roman Empire was aggressively challenged by three Jewish rebellions. The facts surrounding the initial uprising of A.D. 66-74 have been filtered through the biased accounts of Judeao Roman historian Flavius Josephus. Primary information regarding the subsequent Diaspora Revolt (A.D. 115-117) and the Bar Kochba Rebellion (A.D. 132-135) is limited to fragmentary anecdotes emphasizing the religious implications of the two insurrections. In contrast, this analytical history focuses objectively on the military aspects of all three Judean uprisings. The events leading up to each rebellion are detailed, while the nine appendices cover such topics as the nature and number of the Jewish rebels and the factual reliability of the controversial Josephus. One appendix hypothesizes an alternative history of the war between Jerusalem and Rome.