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Living A Life That Matters: From Nazi Nightmare to American Dream

Living A Life That Matters: From Nazi Nightmare to American Dream

In his highly readable, educational and inspiring memoir, Holocaust Survivor Ben Lesser's warm, grandfatherly tone invites the reader to do more than just visit a time when the world went mad. He also shows how this madness came to be-and the lessons that the world still needs to learn. In this true story, the reader will see how an ordinary human being-an innocent child-not only survived the Nazi Nightmare, but achieved the American Dream.

Letters to Sala: A Young Woman's Life in Nazi Labor Camps

Letters to Sala: A Young Woman's Life in Nazi Labor Camps

In October 1940, Sala Garncarz was sixteen, the daughter of a rabbi and teacher and the youngest of eleven children in a poor family living in Sosnowiec, Poland, close to the German border. When her older sister Raizel was ordered to report to a Nazi forced labor camp, Sala volunteered to take her place. Neither she nor her family suspected that six weeks of required labor would stretch to almost five years of slavery. Through letters from family and friends that she managed to hide and keep safe, Letters to Sala tells the story of one young woman's experiences in the most inhumane and unimaginable of situations. An essay by historians Debórah Dwork and Robert Jan van Pelt provides background about the web of Nazi labor camps in occupied Europe, a less-documented and less-familiar aspect of the Holocaust. The illustrations in this volume are drawn primarily from the remarkable collection of more than 300 letters and other documents donated by the Kirschner family to the Dorot Jewish Division of The New York Public Library's Humanities and Social Sciences Library in April 2005. Letters to Sala is the companion volume for the exhibition on view from March 7, 2006-June 17, 2006.

Hidden Horrors: Japanese War Crimes In World War II (Transitions--Asia and Asian America)

Hidden Horrors: Japanese War Crimes In World War II (Transitions--Asia and Asian America)

This book documents for the first time previously hidden Japanese atrocities in World War II, including cannibalism; the slaughter and starvation of prisoners of war; the rape, enforced prostitution, and murder of noncombatants; and biological warfare experiments.The author describes how desperate Japanese soldiers consumed the flesh of their own comrades killed in fighting as well as that of Australians, Pakistanis, and Indians. Another chapter traces the fate of 65 shipwrecked Australian nurses and British soldiers who were shot or stabbed to death by Japanese soldiers. Thirty-two other nurses, who landed on another island, were captured and sent to Sumatra to become “comfort women”—prostitutes for Japanese soldiers. Tanaka recounts how thousands of Australian and British POWs died in the infamous Sandakan camp in the Borneo jungle in 1945. Those who survived were forced to endure a tortuous 160-mile march on which anyone who dropped out of line was immediately shot. Only six escapees lived to tell the tale.Based on exhaustive research in previously closed archives, this book represents a landmark analysis of Japanese war crimes. The author explores individual atrocities in their broader social, psychological, and institutional milieu and places Japanese behavior during the war in the broader context of the dehumanization of men at war—without denying individual and national responsibility.

Inside the Gas Chambers: Eight Months in the Sonderkommando of Auschwitz

Inside the Gas Chambers: Eight Months in the Sonderkommando of Auschwitz

This is a unique, eye-witness account of everyday life right at the heart of the Nazi extermination machine.Slomo Venezia was born into a poor Jewish-Italian community living in Thessaloniki, Greece. At first, the occupying Italians protected his family; but when the Germans invaded, the Venezias were deported to Auschwitz. His mother and sisters disappeared on arrival, and he learned, at first with disbelief, that they had almost certainly been gassed. Given the chance to earn a little extra bread, he agreed to become a ‘Sonderkommando', without realising what this entailed. He soon found himself a member of the ‘special unit' responsible for removing the corpses from the gas chambers and burning their bodies.Dispassionately, he details the grim round of daily tasks, evokes the terror inspired by the man in charge of the crematoria, ‘Angel of Death' Otto Moll, and recounts the attempts made by some of the prisoners to escape, including the revolt of October 1944.It is usual to imagine that none of those who went into the gas chambers at Auschwitz ever emerged to tell their tale - but, as a member of a ‘Sonderkommando', Shlomo Venezia was given this horrific privilege. He knew that, having witnessed the unspeakable, he in turn would probably be eliminated by the SS in case he ever told his tale. He survived: this is his story.Published in association with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Katyn: A Crime Without Punishment (Annals of Communism Series)

Katyn: A Crime Without Punishment (Annals of Communism Series)

The 14,500 Polish army officers, police, gendarmes, and civilians taken prisoner by the Red Army when it invaded eastern Poland in September 1939 were held in three special NKVD camps and executed at three different sites in spring 1940, of which the one in Katyn Forest is the most famous. Another 7,300 prisoners held in NKVD jails in Ukraine and Belarus were also shot at this time, although many others disappeared without trace. The murder of these Poles is among the most monstrous mass murders undertaken by any modern government. Three leading historians of the NKVD massacres of Polish prisoners of war at Katyn, Kharkov, and Tver—now subsumed under “Katyn”—present 122 documents selected from the published Russian and Polish volumes coedited by Natalia S. Lebedeva and Wojciech Materski. The documents, with introductions and notes by Anna M. Cienciala, detail the Soviet killings, the elaborate cover-up, the admission of the truth, and the Katyn question in Soviet/Russian–Polish relations up to the present.

A Civil War: A History Of The Italian Resistance

A Civil War: A History Of The Italian Resistance

A Civil War is a history of the wartime Italian Resistance, recounted by a historian who took part in the struggle against Mussolini’s Fascist Republic. Since its publication in Italy, Claudio Pavone’s masterwork has become indispensable to anyone seeking to understand this period and its continuing importance for the nation’s identity. Pavone casts a sober eye on his protagonists’ ethical and ideological motivations. He uncovers a multilayered conflict, in which class antagonisms, patriotism and political ideals all played a part. A clear understanding of this complexity allows him to explain many details of the post-war transition, as well as the legacy of the Resistance for modern Italy. In addition to being a monumental work of scholarship, A Civil War is a folk history, capturing events, personalities and attitudes that were on the verge of slipping entirely out of recollection to the detriment of Italy’s understanding of itself and its past.

Dreams of Nationhood: American Jewish Communists and the Soviet Birobidzhan Project, 1924-1951 (Jewish Identity in Post-Modern Society)

Dreams of Nationhood: American Jewish Communists and the Soviet Birobidzhan Project, 1924-1951 (Jewish Identity in Post-Modern Society)

The American Jewish Communist movement played a major role in the politics of Jewish communities in cities such as Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, and Philadelphia, as well as in many other centers, between the 1920s and the 1950s. Making extensive use of Yiddish-language books, newspapers, periodicals, pamphlets, and other materials, Dreams of Nationhood traces the ideological and material support provided to the Jewish Autonomous Region of Birobidzhan, located in the far east of the Soviet Union, by two American Jewish Communist-led organizations, the ICOR and the American Birobidzhan Committee. By providing a detailed historical examination of the political work of these two groups, the book makes a substantial contribution to our understanding of twentieth-century Jewish life in the United States.

PORTRAITS OF CONFLICT: A Photographic History of Tennessee in the Civil War

PORTRAITS OF CONFLICT: A Photographic History of Tennessee in the Civil War

It’s one thing to understand that over twenty-thousand Confederate and Union soldiers died at the Battle of Murfreesboro. It’s quite another to study an ambrotype portrait of twenty-year-old private Frank B. Crosthwait, dressed in his Sunday best, looking somberly at the camera. In a tragically short time, he’ll be found on the battlefield, mortally wounded, still clutching the knotted pieces of handkerchief he used in a hopeless attempt to stop the bleeding from his injuries.Private Crosthwait’s image is one of more than 250 portraits—many never before published—to be found in the much anticipated Portraits of Conflict: A Photographic History of Tennessee in the Civil War. The eighth in the distinguished Portraits of Conflict series, this volume joins the personal and the public to provide a uniquely rich portrayal of Tennesseans—in uniforms both blue and gray—who fought and lost their lives in the Civil War.Here is the story of a widow working as a Union spy to support herself and her children. Of a father emerging from his house to find his Confederate soldier son dying at his feet. Of a nine-year-old boy who attached himself to a Union regiment after his mother died. Their stories and faces, joined with personal remembrances from recovered letters and diaries and ample historical information on secession, famous battles, surrender, and Reconstruction, make this new Portraits of Conflict a Civil War treasure.

Operation Barbarossa: The German Invasion of Soviet Russia (General Military)

Operation Barbarossa: The German Invasion of Soviet Russia (General Military)

In the first 6 months of Hitler's World War II Nazi invasion, over 5 million of Stalin's Russian troops were killed, wounded, or captured defending their Motherland. Germany's surprise assault on the Soviet Union in June 1941, Operation Barbarossa, aimed at nothing less than the destruction of the Soviet Union. Adolf Hitler saw this as the last vital step in the establishing of 'Lebensraum' for the German people in the East.Three German Army Groups, supported by numerous European allies, poured across the Soviet border crushing all before them in a lightning campaign that threatened to eliminate all Soviet resistance and secure an easy victory. However, the vast resources and size of Soviet Russia caused the German armoured spearheads to slow and the advance finally ground to a halt within sight of Moscow itself, and with it Hitler's dreams of a quick victory.This book combines Osprey's three Campaign titles on the Barbarossa campaign, along with new material specifically created, in order to tell the story of one of definitive campaigns of World War II.

Patriotism: An immigrant's perspective of loving America

Patriotism: An immigrant's perspective of loving America

This book is an inspiring personal experience and patriotic sentiments of the author about United States of America. From the history of her Assyrian civilization, to the history of the American Presidents, Rose Mary has demonstrated the impacts of our Presidents’ decisions on our nation during and after their term in office. She presents the ideology that perhaps the most effective method in supporting the American culture is the preservation of the old American traditions, family values and high moral standards.

British Cruisers: Two World Wars and After

British Cruisers: Two World Wars and After

With the world s largest merchant fleet and extensive overseas territories during most of the twentieth century, the Royal Navy depended on the cruiser to defend Britain s trade routes and police the empire. In this handsomely illustrated book, the noted ship historian Norman Friedman provides insights into the cruiser s development and Britain s efforts to come to terms with the competing demands of quality and quantity. The first book to offer a comprehensive explanation of the policy background, it presents an entirely original picture of cruiser development. The book s final chapters cover post-war modernizations, plans for missile-armed ships, and the process that turned the through-deck cruiser into the Invincible-class light carrier. With detailed appendixes of ship data and extensive photos and ship plans by A.D. Baker III, Alan Raven, Paul Webb and John Dominy, the work matches the high standards set by Friedman s book on British destroyers.

The Auschwitz Kommandant: A Daughter's Search for the Father She Never Knew

The Auschwitz Kommandant: A Daughter's Search for the Father She Never Knew

Detailing an uncommon upbringing of relative wealth and comfort in World War II Poland, this record spotlights the childhood of a prominent Nazi’s daughter. Depicting her father’s ascension to command Auschwitz, the most infamous of all concentration camps, the author reveals his relationship with his family, his unceasing love for his mistress, and the very separate life he led as a senior officer of the S.S. Chronicling his capture at the end of the war, this narrative also documents his imprisonment at Dachau and Nuremburg, his sentencing at the Auschwitz Trial in Krakow, and his subsequent execution. Recounting a shocking tale with clarity and without judgment, this riveting autobiography embodies one woman’s unwavering mission to resolve her own past.

Conduct Unbecoming: The Story of the Murder of Canadian Prisoners of War in Normandy

Conduct Unbecoming: The Story of the Murder of Canadian Prisoners of War in Normandy

On the afternoon of 7 June 1944, Lorne Brown, a private serving with the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division in Normandy, was bayoneted to death while trying to surrender to troops of Nazi Germany's Tlite 12th SS Division 'Hitler Youth.' Over the next ten days, more than a hundred and fifty Canadian soldiers were brutally murdered after capture by the 12th SS. Despite months of post-war investigation by Allied courts, however, only two senior officers of the 12th SS were ever tried for war crimes.Drawing extensively on archival sources, Howard Margolian reveals the full account of an atrocious chapter in history and exposes the causes - an inept and indifferent Canadian military justice system, and a Canadian government all too willing to let bygones be bygones - of the flagrant inaction that followed. Highly praised for both its meticulous research and its engaging passion, this book will resonate with veterans, those interested in war crimes, military buffs, and historians.

World Criminal Justice Systems, Eighth Edition: A Comparative Survey

World Criminal Justice Systems, Eighth Edition: A Comparative Survey

This comparative text provides an understanding of major world criminal justice systems by discussing and comparing the systems of six of the world's countries: England, France, Russia, China, Japan, and a new chapter on South Africa -- each representative of a different type of legal system. An additional chapter on Islamic law uses Saudi Arabia, Iran, and Turkey as main examples. Political, historical, organizational, procedural, and critical issues confronting the justice systems are explained and analyzed. Each chapter contains material on government, police, judiciary, law, corrections, juvenile justice, and other critical issues.Neat, logical organization enables side-by-side comparisons of the systems of England, France, Japan, Russia, China, and-new to this edition-South Africa, as well as a special chapter covering Islamic law.Enhanced pedagogy includes key concepts,comparative and organizational charts, maps showing the physical context of countries, and updated data on contemporary critical issues. Special online resources feature aids for students such as self-assessment questions, case studies, and special projects including a study of an additional country and an exposition on transnational crime.

Patton's Third Army in World War II: An Illustrated History

Patton's Third Army in World War II: An Illustrated History

Patton was champing at the bit to lead the D-Day invasion, but Eisenhower placed him in command of a decoy unit, the First U.S. Army Group. Nearly seven weeks after D-Day, Patton finally got his chance to take Third Army into battle. He began a ten-month rampage across France, driving through Germany and into Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia and Austria. Along the way Third Army forces entered the Battle of the Bulge, breaking the siege of Bastogne. It was a turning point in the war, and afterward the Third Army pushed eastward again. Patton’s Third Army in World War II covers Patton’s command of Third Army with a focus on the armor. It was a new style of fighting, avoiding entrenched infantry warfare by continuously pushing forward, and it appealed to Patton’s hard-charging personality. Archival photos along with frequent quotes complete the portrait of Patton as well as his men as they fight their way across the Third Reich.

Nuclear Power, Pollution and Politics

Nuclear Power, Pollution and Politics

Places the environmental issues related to the production of nuclear power in their political context. It evaluates the extent of nuclear pollution, in comparison with other forms of power, and looks at the future of energy.

Escape Through Austria: Jewish Refugees and the Austrian Route to Palestine

Escape Through Austria: Jewish Refugees and the Austrian Route to Palestine

After World War II, Jewish refugee camps were scattered across Germany and Austria. Austria straddled the escape routes for the refugees from Central Europe to Italy, where they were able to board illegal immigrant ships for Mandatory Palestine. This work covers insights into modern Jewish history.

Through Soviet Jewish Eyes: Photography, War, and the Holocaust (Jewish Cultures of the World)

Through Soviet Jewish Eyes: Photography, War, and the Holocaust (Jewish Cultures of the World)

Most view the relationship of Jews to the Soviet Union through the lens of repression and silence. Focusing on an elite group of two dozen Soviet-Jewish photographers, including Arkady Shaykhet, Alexander Grinberg, Mark Markov-Grinberg, Evgenii Khaldei, Dmitrii Baltermants, and Max Alpert, Through Soviet Jewish Eyes presents a different picture. These artists participated in a social project they believed in and with which they were emotionally and intellectually invested-they were charged by the Stalinist state to tell the visual story of the unprecedented horror we now call the Holocaust.These wartime photographers were the first liberators to bear witness with cameras to Nazi atrocities, three years before Americans arrived at Buchenwald and Dachau. In this passionate work, David Shneer tells their stories and highlights their work through their very own images-he has amassed never-before-published photographs from families, collectors, and private archives.Through Soviet Jewish Eyes helps us understand why so many Jews flocked to Soviet photography; what their lives and work looked like during the rise of Stalinism, during and then after the war; and why Jews were the ones charged with documenting the Soviet experiment and then its near destruction at the hands of the Nazis.