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Surviving Hitler: A Boy in the Nazi Death Camps

Surviving Hitler: A Boy in the Nazi Death Camps

In 1942 fifteen-year-old Jack Mandelbaum was torn from his family in Poland and sent to a Nazi concentration camp. This is Jack's own true story of how he fought against starvation, disease and the insane brutality of the Holocaust. Jack is sent to a series of different camps, each one as horrific as the other. He soon befriends Moniek, another prisoner, and together they learn to fight through adversity and are finally able to walk free on the day of liberation. This is a personal and touching tale of Jack's World War II experiences, as told by Jack himself to award-winning author Andrea Warren. The book includes a 4-page photo section, including a photo taken of Jack shortly after liberation.

Poetry After Auschwitz: Remembering What One Never Knew (Jewish Literature and Culture)

Poetry After Auschwitz: Remembering What One Never Knew (Jewish Literature and Culture)

In this pathbreaking study, Susan Gubar demonstrates that Theodor Adorno’s famous injunction against writing poetry after Auschwitz paradoxically inspired an ongoing literary tradition. From the 1960s to the present, as the Shoah receded into a more remote European past, many contemporary writers grappled with personal and political, ethical and aesthetic consequences of the disaster. By speaking about or even as the dead, these poets tell what it means to cite, reconfigure, consume, or envy the traumatic memories of an earlier generation. This moving meditation by a major feminist critic finds in poetry a stimulant to empathy that can help us take to heart what we forget at our own peril.

Vietnam: The Real War: A Photographic History by the Associated Press

Vietnam: The Real War: A Photographic History by the Associated Press

To cover the Vietnam War, the Associated Press gathered an extraordinary group of superb photojournalists in its Saigon bureau, creating one of the great photographic legacies of the 20th century. Collected here are images that tell the story of the war that left a deep and lasting impression on American life. These are pictures that both recorded and made history, taken by unbelievably courageous photojournalists. In a moving essay, writer Pete Hamill, who reported from Vietnam in 1965, celebrates their achievement.As we begin to look back from the vantage point of half a century, this is the book that will serve as a photographic record of the drama and tragedy of the Vietnam War.

The Inner World of Trauma: Archetypal Defences of the Personal Spirit (Near Eastern St.;Bibliotheca Persica)

The Inner World of Trauma: Archetypal Defences of the Personal Spirit (Near Eastern St.;Bibliotheca Persica)

Donald Kalsched explores the interior world of dream and fantasy images encountered in therapy with people who have suffered unbearable life experiences. He shows how, in an ironical twist of psychical life, the very images which are generated to defend the self can become malevolent and destructive, resulting in further trauma for the person. Why and how this happens are the questions the book sets out to answer. Drawing on detailed clinical material, the author gives special attention to the problems of addiction and psychosomatic disorder, as well as the broad topic of dissociation and its treatment. By focusing on the archaic and primitive defenses of the self he connects Jungian theory and practice with contemporary object relations theory and dissociation theory. At the same time, he shows how a Jungian understanding of the universal images of myth and folklore can illuminate treatment of the traumatised patient. Trauma is about the rupture of those developmental transitions that make life worth living. Donald Kalsched sees this as a spiritual problem as well as a psychological one and in The Inner World of Trauma he provides a compelling insight into how an inner self-care system tries to save the personal spirit.

World War II Pacific Island Guide: A Geo-Military Study

World War II Pacific Island Guide: A Geo-Military Study

Covering all Pacific islands involved in World War II military operations, this book is a detailed, single source of information on virtually every geo-military aspect of the Pacific Theater. Arranged regionally and, to the extent possible, chronologically according to when islands entered the war, entries provide complete background information. Along with island names, nicknames, Allied code names, location, and wartime time zones, the entries include such topics as the island's physical characteristics, weather, health hazards, historical background, native population, natural resources, and military value. Japanese and Allied strategies and operations, military problems caused by terrain, military installations, Japanese units and key commanders, Allied units and key commanders, and brief battle descriptions are also covered along with the island's postwar status.A valuable resource for researchers, historians, military history enthusiasts, and war gamers, the book provides complete background information on the geo-military aspects of the Pacific Ocean region, its islands, and the roles they played in the war. 108 maps provide specific information. Until now, geo-military information could only be found by searching four to ten publications on each island.

The Unwilling Survivor: A Jewish Officer's True Account of the WWII Eastern Front

The Unwilling Survivor: A Jewish Officer's True Account of the WWII Eastern Front

While probing Nazi supply routes around the recently fallen city of Kiev, Misha, a Soviet intelligence officer, witnesses the aftermath of the mass murder of Jews at Babi Yar. Convinced that the Nazis intend to exterminate all of European Jewry, Misha, a Jew, resolves to travel from the depths of wintry Ukraine to Nazi-occupied Poland, where his family lives. As it relates Misha’s punishing, 600-mile journey to reach his family in time, Unwilling Survivor paints a portrait of one man’s commitment to his principles as well as the indomitability of the human spirit. This is the first part of the story of the family of author Michael Kopiec.

Blowtorch: Robert Komer, Vietnam, and American Cold War Strategy

Blowtorch: Robert Komer, Vietnam, and American Cold War Strategy

History has not been kind to Robert Komer, a casualty of bad historical analysis and inaccurate information. A Cold War national security policy and strategy adviser to three presidents, Komer was one of the most influential national security professionals of the era. The book begins with a review of his early life that helped shape his worldview. It then examines Komer's influence as a National Security Council staff member during the Kennedy administration, where he helped set its activist course regarding the Third World. Upon Kennedy's death, Lyndon Johnson named Komer his "point man" for Vietnam pacification policy, and later General Westmoreland's operational deputy in Vietnam. The author highlights Komer's activities during the three years he strove to fulfill the president's vision that Communism could be repelled from Southeast Asia by economic and social development along with military force. Known as "Blowtorch" for his abrasive personality and disdain for bureaucratic foot dragging, Komer came to be seen as the right person for managing that effort, and in 1968 was rewarded with an ambassadorship to Turkey. The book analyzes Komer's work during the Carter administration as special adviser to Secretary of Defense Harold Brown and Under Secretary of Defense for Policy and credits him for reenergizing the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's conventional capability and forging the military instrument that implemented the Carter Doctrine in the Persian Gulf--the Rapid Deployment Joint Task Force. It also explores his final role as a defense intellectual and critic of the Reagan administration's defense policies. The book concludes with a useful summary of Komer's impact on American policy and strategy and his contributions to counterinsurgency practices, a legacy now recognized for its importance in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

War of the Flea: The Classic Study of Guerrilla Warfare

War of the Flea: The Classic Study of Guerrilla Warfare

“The guerrilla fights the war of the flea, and his military enemy suffers the dog’s disadvantages: too much to defend; too small, ubiquitous, and agile an enemy to come to grips with.” With these words, Robert Taber began a revolution in conventional military thought that has dramatically impacted the way armed conflicts have been fought since the book’s initial publication in 1965. Whether ideological, nationalistic, or religious, all guerrilla insurgencies use similar tactics to advance their cause. War of the Flea's timeless analysis of the guerrilla fighter’s means and methods provides a fundamental resource for any reader seeking to understand this distinct form of warfare and the challenge it continues to present to today’s armed forces in the Philippines, Colombia, and elsewhere.

The Seven Years War: A Transatlantic History (War, History and Politics)

The Seven Years War: A Transatlantic History (War, History and Politics)

This is the first comprehensive one-volume overview of the diplomatic, military and maritime history of the causes and conduct of the Seven Years’ War and its American manifestation, the French and Indian War (1753-63). The Seven Years’ War was the first global conflict in history and a precursor to the American War of Independence. The authors summarize both older and more recent scholarship on these subjects, and synthesize them in a complete annotated bibliography. The book also includes biographical sketches and critical reappraisals of some of the major figures of the period The Seven Years War will be of great interest to students of the Seven Years War, American history, diplomatic and military history.

Orrin's Story: Patriotism and Love of Country. The Union Now and Forever

Orrin's Story: Patriotism and Love of Country. The Union Now and Forever

Orrin's Story is a collection of 24 letters written by a Union private in the Excelsior Brigade to his family in Maine. They provide reflective accounts of major battles including Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the siege of Petersburg and the Confederate surrender at Appomattox through the eyes of an American patriot with deeply-held family and cultural values.

NATO, Britain, France, and the FRG: Nuclear Strategies and Forces for Europe, 1949-2000

NATO, Britain, France, and the FRG: Nuclear Strategies and Forces for Europe, 1949-2000

Containing the histories (from 1945 to the present) of the nuclear strategies of NATO, Britain and France, and of the defence preferences of the FRG (West Germany), this book shows how strategies were functions of a perceived Soviet threat and an American 'nuclear guarantee'. There were three options for West Europeans: a compromise with differing American needs in NATO, pursued by Britain and the FRG; national nuclear forces, developed by Britain and France; and projects for an independent European nuclear force.

The War That Ended Peace: The Road to 1914

The War That Ended Peace: The Road to 1914

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review • The Economist • The Christian Science Monitor • Bloomberg Businessweek • The Globe and MailFrom the bestselling and award-winning author of Paris 1919 comes a masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, a fascinating portrait of Europe from 1900 up to the outbreak of World War I.   The century since the end of the Napoleonic wars had been the most peaceful era Europe had known since the fall of the Roman Empire. In the first years of the twentieth century, Europe believed it was marching to a golden, happy, and prosperous future. But instead, complex personalities and rivalries, colonialism and ethnic nationalisms, and shifting alliances helped to bring about the failure of the long peace and the outbreak of a war that transformed Europe and the world.   The War That Ended Peace brings vividly to life the military leaders, politicians, diplomats, bankers, and the extended, interrelated family of crowned heads across Europe who failed to stop the descent into war: in Germany, the mercurial Kaiser Wilhelm II and the chief of the German general staff, Von Moltke the Younger; in Austria-Hungary, Emperor Franz Joseph, a man who tried, through sheer hard work, to stave off the coming chaos in his empire; in Russia, Tsar Nicholas II and his wife; in Britain, King Edward VII, Prime Minister Herbert Asquith, and British admiral Jacky Fisher, the fierce advocate of naval reform who entered into the arms race with Germany that pushed the continent toward confrontation on land and sea.   There are the would-be peacemakers as well, among them prophets of the horrors of future wars whose warnings went unheeded: Alfred Nobel, who donated his fortune to the cause of international understanding, and Bertha von Suttner, a writer and activist who was the first woman awarded Nobel’s new Peace Prize. Here too we meet the urbane and cosmopolitan Count Harry Kessler, who noticed many of the early signs that something was stirring in Europe; the young Winston Churchill, then First Lord of the Admiralty and a rising figure in British politics; Madame Caillaux, who shot a man who might have been a force for peace; and more. With indelible portraits, MacMillan shows how the fateful decisions of a few powerful people changed the course of history.   Taut, suspenseful, and impossible to put down, The War That Ended Peace is also a wise cautionary reminder of how wars happen in spite of the near-universal desire to keep the peace. Destined to become a classic in the tradition of Barbara Tuchman’s The Guns of August, The War That Ended Peace enriches our understanding of one of the defining periods and events of the twentieth century.   Praise for The War That Ended Peace  “Magnificent . . . The War That Ended Peace will certainly rank among the best books of the centennial crop.”—The Economist   “Superb.”—The New York Times Book Review   “Masterly . . . marvelous . . . Those looking to understand why World War I happened will have a hard time finding a better place to start.”—The Christian Science Monitor   “The debate over the war’s origins has raged for years. Ms. MacMillan’s explanation goes straight to the heart of political fallibility. . . . Elegantly written, with wonderful character sketches of the key players, this is a book to be treasured.”—The Wall Street Journal“A magisterial 600-page panorama.”—Christopher Clark, London Review of Books

The Great War: A Combat History of the First World War

The Great War: A Combat History of the First World War

Named one of the Ten Best Books of 2013 by The EconomistWorld War I altered the landscape of the modern world in every conceivable arena. Millions died; empires collapsed; new ideologies and political movements arose; poison gas, warplanes, tanks, submarines, and other technologies appeared. "Total war" emerged as a grim, mature reality. In The Great War, Peter Hart provides a masterful combat history of this global conflict. Focusing on the decisive engagements, Hart explores the immense challenges faced by the commanders on all sides. He surveys the belligerent nations, analyzing their strengths, weaknesses, and strategic imperatives. Russia, for example, was obsessed with securing an exit from the Black Sea, while France--having lost to Prussia in 1871, before Germany united--constructed a network of defensive alliances, even as it held a grudge over the loss of Alsace-Lorraine. Hart offers deft portraits of the commanders, the prewar plans, and the unexpected obstacles and setbacks that upended the initial operations.

Vietnam Rough Riders: A Convoy Commander's Memoir (Modern War Studies)

Vietnam Rough Riders: A Convoy Commander's Memoir (Modern War Studies)

"Vietnam Rough Riders: A Convoy Commander's Memoir," has been nominated for a Pulitzer Prize in the category of Autobiography/Biography.Black smoke drifted about the scene. The first thing I noticed was the huge crater yawning next to the damaged truck.In the Vietnam War, American "rough riders" drove trucks through hostile territory delivering supplies, equipment, ammunition, weapons, fuel, and reinforcements to troops fighting on the war's ever-shifting front lines. But, all too often, the convoys themselves became the front lines. Frank McAdams, a Marine Corps lieutenant, learned that the hard way during a tour of duty that began right after the 1968 Tet Offensive and the siege at Khe Sanh. In this compelling memoir he recounts his personal battles--not only with a dangerous enemy but also with an incompetent superior and a sometimes indifferent military bureaucracy.A decidedly different take on the Vietnam experience, his chronicle focuses on the ambush-prone truck convoys that snaked their way through dangerous terrain in narrow mountain passes and overgrown jungles. When an ambush occurred, strong leadership and quick thinking were required of officers like McAdams to protect both the convoy's mission and the lives of its men. McAdams describes convoys he led through hot zones like the notorious "Ambush Alley" stretching from Danang through Hai Van Pass to Phu Bai in the north, and the provincial area in the south known as "the Arizona" that surrounded the villages of Phu Loc and An Hoa. He also highlights the fierce three-day firefight that ensnared him and his men near the Song Cau Du River at Hoa Vang, and provides a particularly gripping account of the fighting at Thuong Duc. McAdams deals frankly with his fraught dealings with a commanding officer whose ineptness and treatment of his troops made the CO fear for his own life. And he writes movingly of his wife's love and encouragement in the face of an emotionally tough separation and also of his difficulty in re-engaging with life stateside. Fast-paced and compulsively readable, his book offers an insightful look at a largely neglected aspect of the Vietnam War, while reminding us of how frequently the crucible of war reveals one's true character. This book is part of the Modern War Studies series.

Honor & Respect: The Official Guide to Names, Titles, and Forms of Address

Honor & Respect: The Official Guide to Names, Titles, and Forms of Address

A reference for those interested in formal communication in a rapidly changing world. This book provides correct written and oral forms of address for everyone from local officials to foreign heads of state. It includes a glossary, guidelines for use and style, and forms of address and information on high officials from more than 180 foreign countries. Officials in the United States, Australia, Great Britain, and Canada are covered in detail. Includes how to address a letter or invitation, the correct salutation and closing, how to create a place card, make an introduction, and how to directly address an official in conversation. 6" x 9" hardcover, 576 pages, complete index Smyth-sewn library binding to lie flat for easy reference. Archival acid-free paper

Prisoners of Nazis : Accounts by American POWs in World War II

Prisoners of Nazis : Accounts by American POWs in World War II

The Nazis called them Kriegsgefangen, a term that the prisoners of war shortened to "Kriegie." The nickname hid the reality for the nearly seven million POWs who were placed in the German camps during World War II. These men consistently faced food shortages, medical needs were often ignored, barracks were barely heated, and personal hygiene was nearly impossible. Conditions depended on the soldiers who controlled the camp. Regular army guards might withhold clothing and food, but generally did not physically abuse the prisoners. The SS troops administered beatings, torture and murders. In this work, 19 POWs provide a vivid and often poignant look at their treatment by the Germans. The soldiers range from those captured in the D-Day invasion to B-17 crew members shot down during bombing raids.

The Cambridge History of War: Volume 4, War and the Modern World

The Cambridge History of War: Volume 4, War and the Modern World

Volume IV of The Cambridge History of War offers a definitive new account of war in the most destructive period in human history. Opening with the massive conflicts that erupted in the mid-nineteenth century in the US, Asia and Europe, leading historians trace the global evolution of warfare through 'the age of mass', 'the age of machine', and 'the age of management'. They explore how industrialization and nationalism fostered vast armies whilst the emergence of mobile warfare and improved communications systems made possible the 'total warfare' of the two World Wars. With military conflict regionalized after 1945 they show how guerrilla and asymmetrical warfare highlighted the limits of the machine and mass as well as the importance of the media in winning 'hearts and minds'. This is a comprehensive guide to every facet of modern war from strategy and operations to its social, cultural, technological and political contexts and legacies.

The Japanese Effect in Contemporary Irish Poetry

The Japanese Effect in Contemporary Irish Poetry

The Japanese Effect in Contemporary Irish Poetry provides a stimulating, original and lively analysis of the Irish-Japanese literary connection from the early 1960s to 2006. While for some this may partly remain Oscar Wilde's 'mode of style', this book will show that there is more of Japan in the work of contemporary Irish poets than 'a tinkling of china/ and tea into china.' Drawing on unpublished new sources, Irene De Angelis includes poets from a broad range of cultural backgrounds with richly varied styles: Seamus Heaney, Derek Mahon, Ciaran Carson and Paul Muldoon, together with younger poets such as Sinéad Morrissey and Joseph Woods. Including close readings of selected poems, this is an indispensable companion for all those interested in the broader historical and cultural research on the effect of oriental literature in modernist and postmodernist Irish poetry.