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The Dakota Prisoner of War Letters: Dakota Kaskapi Okicize Wowapi

The Dakota Prisoner of War Letters: Dakota Kaskapi Okicize Wowapi

In April 1863—after the Dakota War of 1862, after the hanging of thirty-eight Dakota men in the largest mass execution in U.S. history— some 270 Dakota men were moved from Mankato, Minnesota, to a prison at Camp McClellan in Davenport, Iowa. Separated from their wives, children, and elder relatives, with inadequate shelter, they lived there for three long, wretched years. More than 120 men died. Desperate to connect with their families, many of these prisoners of war learned to write. Their letters, mostly addressed to the missionaries Stephen R. Riggs and Thomas S. Williamson, asked for information, for assistance, and for help sending and receiving news of their loved ones.Dakota elders Clifford Canku and Michael Simon, fluent Dakota speakers, provide both the transcription and the first published translation of fifty of these letters, culled from Riggs’s papers at the Minnesota Historical Society. They are a precious resource for Dakota people learning about the travails their ancestors faced, important primary source documents for historians, and a vital tool for Dakota language learners and linguists.These haunting documents present a history that has long been unrecognized in this country, in the words of the Dakota people who lived it. The dedication written by the authors, both of whom are descendents of Dakota prisoners of war, declares: “Our relatives are watching over us. / We are humbled as we honor our ancestors. / Woecon kin de unyakupi do / We accept this responsibility you gave us.”Dr. Clifford Canku is an assistant professor of Dakota Studies at North Dakota State University. Michael Simon is an instructor of Dakota language for the Moorhead (Minnesota) Public Schools. Both are retired Presbyterian ministers and enrolled members of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate.

Honor and Obey: Honor Series (Volume 3)

Honor and Obey: Honor Series (Volume 3)

**Contains adult content. Not suitable for under 18 yrs.**There are two sides to every story.~Book 3 of the Honor Series~ Emma has found the love of her life, but his dark secrets could change everything. With a horrible accident and the loss of another loved one, the student must become the teacher. As secrets begin to unravel, will she be able to look passed them or will she have to leave William and start life new again?**256 pages**

World War II in Numbers: An Infographic Guide to the Conflict, Its Conduct, and Its Casualities

World War II in Numbers: An Infographic Guide to the Conflict, Its Conduct, and Its Casualities

A different way to understand the magnitude of World War II. Countless books exist about the Second World War and in those can be found all of the statistics to be had: numbers killed, bombs dropped, battles won and lost, ad infinitum. But to see these numbers as infographics gives the reader a fresh perspective on the war. World War II in Numbers uses color graphics and succinct text to tell the key stories of the battles that engulfed the globe and affected virtually everyone alive during the 1940s. To see the war set out in numbers tells the story with a new certainty: how the Polish Home Army carried out more than 700,000 acts of sabotage the large number of Japanese lost in the Pacific War how Allied tanks stood up to the armor-piercing power of the Panzerfaust the damage the Kamikaze inflicted on Allied ships during the Okinawa Campaign the number of unexploded bombs reported on the island of Malta that in 1944 alone 914,637 tons of bombs were dropped on German cities by how much the Allied forces outnumbered the Germans in Normandy how the ten costliest land battles in WWII compare with those of WWI. The book sets out six chapters with topics discussed in two- and four-page infographics spreads, including certainty: Preparation for War -- Territorial skirmishes, shifting borders, militarism and alliances. Land Campaigns -- Key battles and the military might that fought them. Weapons and Innovations - From the Polish Calvary to the A-Bomb. In the Air -- Aces and blitzes. At Sea -- The war expands to the world's oceans. Costs -- The price of war and its legacy. Compelling, a superb teaching tool, ideal for casual reading and a must-have for military hobbyists, World War II in Numbers is an exciting and powerful perspective on the global conflict.

The Jewish Dark Continent: Life and Death in the Russian Pale of Settlement

The Jewish Dark Continent: Life and Death in the Russian Pale of Settlement

At the turn of the twentieth century, over forty percent of the world’s Jews lived within the Russian Empire, almost all in the Pale of Settlement. From the Baltic to the Black Sea, the Jews of the Pale created a distinctive way of life little known beyond its borders. This led the historian Simon Dubnow to label the territory a Jewish “Dark Continent.” Just before World War I, a socialist revolutionary and aspiring ethnographer named An-sky pledged to explore the Pale. He dreamed of leading an ethnographic expedition that would produce an archive—what he called an Oral Torah of the common people rather than the rabbinic elite—which would preserve Jewish traditions and transform them into the seeds of a modern Jewish culture. Between 1912 and 1914, An-sky and his team collected jokes, recorded songs, took thousands of photographs, and created a massive ethnographic questionnaire. Consisting of 2,087 questions in Yiddish—exploring the gamut of Jewish folk beliefs and traditions, from everyday activities to spiritual exercises to marital intimacies—the Jewish Ethnographic Program constitutes an invaluable portrait of Eastern European Jewish life on the brink of destruction. Nathaniel Deutsch offers the first complete translation of the questionnaire, as well as the riveting story of An-sky’s almost messianic efforts to create a Jewish ethnography in an era of revolutionary change. An-sky’s project was halted by World War I, and within a few years the Pale of Settlement would no longer exist. These survey questions revive and reveal shtetl life in all its wonder and complexity.

Hills of Sacrifice: The 5th Rct in Korea

Hills of Sacrifice: The 5th Rct in Korea

Detailed account of the 5th Regimental Combat Team in the Koren War. Includes a comprehensive list of 5th RCT unit casualties and Korean Ex-Prisoners of War. Indexed for easy referencing. Foreword written by Ltgen Alpha Bowser, G-3, 1st Marine Division, Korea 1950-1951. Much of the information in this book about the Korean War has never before been published. Hills of Sacrifice is a magnificent history of 'Hawaii's own', the 5th RCT during the Korean War. It will be widely read, and deserves to be"". -- Governor Benjamin J. Cayetano, State of Hawaii ""At last, after 49 years, the best and most definitive book on infantry combat at the bayonet level in Korea. It grips the reader into the firestorm, fury, terror and grief of it all. Hills of Sacrifice is deeply researched, grimly detailed, personalized historiography of battlefield infantry action by American 'grunts' fighting determined North Korean and Chinese soldiers. This superb book is not for the faint-hearted. Graphic descriptions of the bloody details of close-in grunt infantry battle and the love of soldiers for one another"". -- LTGEN Harold G. Moore ""A hell of a read! Hills of Sacrifice explodes like a hand grenade and is riveting combat reportage. It's the most detailed account of the bloody Korean War that I have read. The reader is there in the trenches, with the Grunts, stopping massed attacks or storming enemy held hills. The 5th RCT was a great regiment, with top leaders, brave warriors, and this remarkable book captures their gallantry and sacrifice dead on target. A must read for anyone wanting to know the Grunt's heroic story from the Korean War and how a gallant regiment became the Fire Brigad of the KoreanWar"". -- COL David H. Hackworth""

The Fifth Diamond

The Fifth Diamond

As a young girl in Hungary, Irene Weisberg Zisblatt was taken by the Nazis and became a prisoner in the dehumanizing Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp. She witnessed and experienced unspeakable cruelty, lost her entire family to the gas chambers, and became one of Josef Mengele's "guinea pigs". Somehow she survived, through her hope and faith and the strength drawn from her unshakeable bond with her best friend, Sabka. The Fifth Diamond: The Story of Irene Weisberg Zisblatt is a testament to the triumph of the human spirit. It took Irene fifty years to break free of the terror of her experience and speak about it for the Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation, and in Stephen Spielberg's Oscar-winning documentary, "The Last Days." Now, in this new biography written with Gail Ann Webb, Irene continues her quest to educate children, in order to rid the world of prejudice, intolerance, and indifference.

Living A Life That Matters: From Nazi Nightmare to American Dream

Living A Life That Matters: From Nazi Nightmare to American Dream

In his highly readable, educational and inspiring memoir, Holocaust Survivor Ben Lesser's warm, grandfatherly tone invites the reader to do more than just visit a time when the world went mad. He also shows how this madness came to be-and the lessons that the world still needs to learn. In this true story, the reader will see how an ordinary human being-an innocent child-not only survived the Nazi Nightmare, but achieved the American Dream.

First the Egg (Caldecott Honor Book and Theodor Seuss Geisel Honor Book (Awards))

First the Egg (Caldecott Honor Book and Theodor Seuss Geisel Honor Book (Awards))

WHICH CAME FIRST?  The chicken or the egg?  Simple die-cuts magically present transformation-- from seed to flower, tadpole to frog, caterpillar to butterfly. The acclaimed author of  Black? White! Day? Night! and Lemons Are Not Red gives an entirely fresh and  memorable presentation to the concepts of transformation and creatiity.  Seed becomes flower, paint becomes picture, word becomes story--and the commonplace becomes extraordinary as children look through and turn the pages of this novel and winning book. First the Egg is a 2008 Caldecott Honor Book and a 2007 New York Times Book Review Best Illustrated Book of the Year.

Healing Together: The Labor-Management Partnership at Kaiser Permanente (The Culture and Politics of Health Care Work)

Healing Together: The Labor-Management Partnership at Kaiser Permanente (The Culture and Politics of Health Care Work)

Kaiser Permanente is the largest managed care organization in the country. It also happens to have the largest and most complex labor-management partnership ever created in the United States. This book tells the story of that partnership-how it started, how it grew, who made it happen, and the lessons to be learned from its successes and complications. With twenty-seven unions and an organization as complex as 8.6-million-member Kaiser Permanente, establishing the partnership was not a simple task and maintaining it has proven to be extraordinarily challenging.Thomas A. Kochan, Adrienne E. Eaton, Robert B. McKersie, and Paul S. Adler are among a team of researchers who have been tracking the evolution of the partnership between Kaiser Permanente and the Coalition of Kaiser Permanente Unions ever since 2001. They review the history of health care labor relations and present a profile of Kaiser Permanente as it has developed over the years. They then delve into the partnership, discussing its achievements and struggles, including the negotiation of the most innovative collective bargaining agreements in the history of American labor relations. Healing Together concludes with an assessment of the Kaiser partnership's effect on the larger health care system and its implications for labor-management relations in other industries.

SOG: The Secret Wars of America's Commandos in Vietnam

SOG: The Secret Wars of America's Commandos in Vietnam

SOG was the most secret elite U.S. military unit to serve in the war in Vietnam, so secret it was "black" - meaning its very existence was carefully concealed, even denied by the government. Innocuously code-named the Studies and Observations Group, SOG contained only volunteers from such units as the Army Green Berets, USAF Air Commandos and Navy SEALs, and answered directly to the Pentagon's Joint Chiefs, with some missions requiring approval from the White House. Inside Vietnam, only General William Westmoreland and a few senior non-SOG officers were briefed on SOG activities. Now Major John L. Plaster, a three-tour SOG veteran, vividly recounts the never-before-revealed exploits.SOG took on the most dangerous assignments, going behind enemy lines to penetrate North Vietnamese military facilities in Laos and Cambodia and along the heavily defended Ho Chi Minh Trail, where only air support - and sometimes no support at all - was available. As colorful as they were he­roic, the men of SOG were bound together by their dedication. Though few in number, they were awarded ten Medals of Honor and hundreds of Purple Hearts. Their ranks included the war's most highly decorated unit, as well as the most highly decorated American soldier. Now their stories, among the most extraordinary to come out of the Vietnam War, can at at last be told.This Paladin reprint contains an exclusive new foreword by General John Singlaub, who served as Chief SOG from 1966 to 1968.

Complications: Communism and the Dilemmas of Democracy (Columbia Studies in Political Thought / Political History)

Complications: Communism and the Dilemmas of Democracy (Columbia Studies in Political Thought / Political History)

"Complications: Communism and the Dilemmas of Democracy" ties together the central concerns of the work of Claude Lefort over the past half-century. A pivotal figure in French thought, Lefort studied under Maurice Merleau-Ponty, cofounded with Cornelius Castoriadis the influential journal "Socialisme ou Barbarie", and famously engaged in a heated debate with Jean-Paul Sartre over the Soviet Union and Communist parties in the West. He has influenced generations of political thinkers and throughout his career has offered invaluable leftist, non-communist critiques of both liberalism and Communism.It is the prevailing belief that the death of communism was a victory for liberal democracy. In "Complications", however, Lefort challenges this interpretation and provides new ways of understanding the rise and fall of the Soviet Union and the Communist phenomenon. Lefort engages the work of prominent historians Martin Malia and Francois Furet and shows how their emphasis on 'illusion' and ideology led to their failure to understand the logic and workings of the Communist Party, and its impact on Soviet society, and the reasons why so many in the West had Communist sympathies.He also maintains that those who regard the end of Communism as the triumph of markets and 'freedom' restrict the scope of democratic thought and the possibility of greater social equality. Lefort contends that Communism must be seen as part of a larger history of modernity and believes that the diagnosis of its death is dangerous to the future of democracy. In the tradition of Hannah Arendt and Raymond Aron, Lefort complicates the pieties of historical understanding and offers a new approach to thinking about totalitarianism and a more vital democracy.

Race Patriotism: Protest and Print Culture in the A.M.E. Church

Race Patriotism: Protest and Print Culture in the A.M.E. Church

Race Patriotism: Protest and Print Culture in the A.M.E. Church examines important nineteenth-century social issues through the lens of the AME Church and its publications.  This book explores the ways in which leaders and laity constructed historical narratives around varied locations to sway public opinion of the day.  Drawing on the official church newspaper, the Christian Recorder, and other denominational and rare major primary sources, Bailey goes beyond previously published works that focus solely on the founding era of the tradition or the eastern seaboard or post-bellum South to produce a work than breaks new historiographical ground by spanning the entirety of the nineteenth century and exploring new geographical terrain such as the American West.Through careful analysis of AME print culture, Bailey demonstrates that far from focusing solely on the “politics of uplift” and seeking to instill bourgeois social values in black society as other studies have suggested, black authors, intellectuals, and editors used institutional histories and other writings for activist purposes and reframed protest in new ways in the postbellum period.Adding significantly to the literature on the history of the book and reading in the nineteenth century, Bailey examines AME print culture as a key to understanding African American social reform recovering the voices of black religious leaders and writers to provide a more comprehensive and nuanced portrayal of the central debates and issues facing African Americans in the nineteenth century such as migration westward, selecting the appropriate referent for the race, Social Darwinism, and the viability of emigration to Africa.  Scholars and students of religious studies, African American studies, American studies, history, and journalism will welcome this pioneering new study.Julius H. Bailey is the author of Around the Family Altar: Domesticity in the African Methodist Episcopal Church, 1865–1900.  He is an associate professor in the Religious Studies Department at the University of Redlands in Redlands, California. 

Orrin's Story: Patriotism and Love of Country. The Union Now and Forever

Orrin's Story: Patriotism and Love of Country. The Union Now and Forever

Orrin's Story is a collection of 24 letters written by a Union private in the Excelsior Brigade to his family in Maine. They provide reflective accounts of major battles including Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the siege of Petersburg and the Confederate surrender at Appomattox through the eyes of an American patriot with deeply-held family and cultural values.

The Dragon Extends its Reach: Chinese Military Power Goes Global

The Dragon Extends its Reach: Chinese Military Power Goes Global

China has evolved from a nation with local and regional security interests to a major economic and political power with global interests, investments, and political commitments. It now requires a military that can project itself around the globe, albeit on a limited scale, to secure its interests. Therefore, as Larry M. Wortzel explains, the Chinese Communist Party leadership has charged the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) with new and challenging missions that require global capabilities.Advances in technology and the development of indigenous weapons platforms in China, combined with reactions to modern conflicts, have produced a military force very different from that which China has fielded in the past. Wortzel presents a clear and sobering picture of the PLA’s modernization effort as it expands into space and cyberspace, and as it integrates operations in the traditional domains of war.This book will appeal to the specialist in security and foreign policy issues in Asia as well as to the person interested in arms control, future warfare, and global military strategies. The book puts China’s military growth into historical context for readers of recent military and diplomatic history.

The Unwilling Survivor: A Jewish Officer's True Account of the WWII Eastern Front

The Unwilling Survivor: A Jewish Officer's True Account of the WWII Eastern Front

While probing Nazi supply routes around the recently fallen city of Kiev, Misha, a Soviet intelligence officer, witnesses the aftermath of the mass murder of Jews at Babi Yar. Convinced that the Nazis intend to exterminate all of European Jewry, Misha, a Jew, resolves to travel from the depths of wintry Ukraine to Nazi-occupied Poland, where his family lives. As it relates Misha’s punishing, 600-mile journey to reach his family in time, Unwilling Survivor paints a portrait of one man’s commitment to his principles as well as the indomitability of the human spirit. This is the first part of the story of the family of author Michael Kopiec.

Balkan Genocides: Holocaust and Ethnic Cleansing in the Twentieth Century (Studies in Genocide: Religion, History, and Human Rights)

Balkan Genocides: Holocaust and Ethnic Cleansing in the Twentieth Century (Studies in Genocide: Religion, History, and Human Rights)

During the 20th century, the Balkan Peninsula was affected by three major waves of genocides and ethnic cleansings, some of which are still being denied today. In Balkan Genocides Paul Mojzes provides a balanced and detailed account of these events, placing them in their proper historical context and debunking the common misrepresentations and misunderstandings of the genocides themselves. A native of Yugoslavia, Mojzes offers new insights into the Balkan genocides, including a look at the unique role of ethnoreligiosity in these horrific events and a characterization of the first and second Balkan wars as mutual genocides. Mojzes also looks to the region's future, discussing the ongoing trials at the International Criminal Tribunal in Yugoslavia and the prospects for dealing with the lingering issues between Balkan nations and different religions. Balkan Genocides attempts to end the vicious cycle of revenge which has fueled such horrors in the past century by analyzing the terrible events and how they came to pass.

Loyal Forces: The American Animals of World War II

Loyal Forces: The American Animals of World War II

During World War II, the U.S. called upon all its citizens to contribute to the war effort, encouraging them to enlist, buy war bonds, and collect scrap metal. The use of American animals during the conflict further demonstrates the resourcefulness of the U.S. military and the many sacrifices that led to the Allies victory. Through 157 photographs from the National World War II Museum collection, Loyal Forces captures the heroism, hard work, and innate skills of innumerable animals that aided the troops as they fought to protect, transport, communicate, and sustain morale. From the last mounted cavalry charge of the U.S. Army to the 36,000 homing pigeons deployed overseas, service animals made a significant impact on military operations during World War II. Authors Toni M. Kiser and Lindsey F. Barnes deftly illustrate that every branch of the armed forces and every theater of the war including the home front utilized the instincts and dexterity of these dependable creatures, who, though not always in the direct line of enemy fire, had their lives put at risk for the jobs they performed.

Strange Fire: Reading the Bible after the Holocaust

Strange Fire: Reading the Bible after the Holocaust

There can be little doubt that the Holocaust was an event of major consequence for the twentieth century. While there have been innumerable volumes published on the implications of the Holocaust for history, philosophy, and ethics, there has been a surprising lack of attention paid to the theoretical and practical effects of the Shoah on biblical interpretation. Strange Fire addresses the implications of the Holocaust for interpretation of the Hebrew Bible, bringing together a diverse and distinguished range of contributors, including Richard Rubenstein, Elie Wiesel, and Walter Brueggemann, to discuss theoretical and methodological considerations emerging from the Shoah and to demonstrate the importance of these considerations in the reading of specific biblical texts. The volume addresses such issues as Jewish and Christian biblical theology after the Holocaust, the ethics of Christian appropriation of Jewish scripture, and the rethinking of biblical models of suffering and sacrifice from a post-Holocaust perspective. The first book of its kind, Strange Fire will establish a benchmark for all future work on the topic.