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U.S. Army Helicopter Names in Vietnam

U.S. Army Helicopter Names in Vietnam

The personal naming of military aircraft in the Vietnam War is not unique in American history. What is unique is the near total lack of documentation of the existence of those names on in-country Army helicopters during the 1961-'73 conflict in S. E. Asia. This book remedies that once and for all! -Over 3,000 Army copter names cross-referenced by Unit -Details on Origin, Time Period, Location, Function, Type, Serial Number, Artist, Crew and more -More than 2,000 contributor names listed and cross-referenced -Perfect for veterans, hobbyists, historical researchers, KIA families, sociologists, aviation enthusiasts and students of Americana-just to name a few -Includes 40 rare photographs U.S. Army Helicopter Names in Vietnam provides an essential and heretofore missing puzzle piece in helping to identify and better understand our warrior brothers, fathers, uncles, sons and friends who manned these incredible flying machines in the skies of Vietnam.

Korean Atrocity!: Forgotten War Crimes, 1950-1953

Korean Atrocity!: Forgotten War Crimes, 1950-1953

Recently declassified records on the Korean War have brought to light widespread and systemic war crimes committed by North Koreans and Chinese against troops serving under the United Nations command, according to this study. After examining over 1,600 cases, Philip Chinnery recounts his searing findings in this tragic three-part narrative. Part one covers the first year of the war, when most of the battlefield war crimes, death marches, and atrocities took place. The second part deals with the horrors prisoners faced at the hands of their captors, including starvation, slave labor, and medical experimentation. Part three delves into the prisoners' repatriation at war's end and the disturbing evidence that some of the 7,956 American and 100 British serviceman considered missing in action may have been left behind at the close of the war. In one of many examples, he sites a formerly confidential U.S. Government document that discusses a B-29 crew's release by the Chinese two years after the war ended and how the crew was ordered to keep quiet about the prisoners still under communist control. Had there been a clear victor in Korea instead of a truce, the author believes that war crime trials would have followed.

Jewish War

Jewish War

Josephus’ account of a war marked by treachery and atrocity is a superbly detailed and evocative record of the Jewish rebellion against Rome between AD 66 and 70. Originally a rebel leader, Josephus changed sides after he was captured to become a Rome-appointed negotiator, and so was uniquely placed to observe these turbulent events, from the siege of Jerusalem to the final heroic resistance and mass suicides at Masada. His account provides much of what we know about the history of the Jews under Roman rule, with vivid portraits of such key figures as the Emperor Vespasian and Herod the Great. Often self-justifying and divided in its loyalties, The Jewish War nevertheless remains one of the most immediate accounts of war, its heroism and its horrors, ever written.

An Illustrated Encyclopedia of Military Uniforms of the 19th Century: An Expert Guide to the American Civil War, the Boer War, the Wars of German and Italian Unification and the Colonial Wars

An Illustrated Encyclopedia of Military Uniforms of the 19th Century: An Expert Guide to the American Civil War, the Boer War, the Wars of German and Italian Unification and the Colonial Wars

The Crimean War is sometimes considered to be the first modern conflict and introduced technical changes which affected the future course of warfare.

U.S. Navy Uniforms and Insignia 1940-1942 (U.S. Navy Uniforms in World War II Series)

U.S. Navy Uniforms and Insignia 1940-1942 (U.S. Navy Uniforms in World War II Series)

Volume four in the series, this is the first book of its kind to examine the clothing, equipment and accoutrements used by the United States Navy through the early years of World War II. Beginning with the pre-war lineage of U.S. Navy uniforms in the 1920s, this volume chronologically documents Midshipmen's uniforms, recruit training and issue items including sea bag layouts and hammocks, with over 800 original and contemporary images. Wartime U.S. Navy insignia worn by commissioned officers, warrant officers and chief petty officers is featured with concise descriptions and detailed photographs. Additionally, a complete catalog of enlisted men's rating badges and distinguishing marks are showcased in brilliant full color with detailed and informative captions. As a bonus, the complete 1941 U.S. Navy Uniform Regulations with all wartime changes and amendments is included on CD-ROM.

Contemporary Business

Contemporary Business

Contemporary Business 14th Edition gives students the business language they need to feel confident in taking the first steps toward becoming successful business majors and successful business people. With new integrated E-Business context throughout the text, it provides a new approach. Another addition is the "Green Business" boxes in every chapter to provide student's with more Green Business information. All of the information provided is put together in a format easy for all students to understand, allowing for a better grasp of the information.

Jewish Integration in the German Army in the First World War (New Perspectives on Modern Jewish History)

Jewish Integration in the German Army in the First World War (New Perspectives on Modern Jewish History)

In ""Jewish Identities, the German Army, and the First World War"" David J. Fine offers a surprising portrayal of Jewish officers in the German army as integrated and comfortably identified as both Jews and Germans. Looking at how Judaism and Christianity were practiced in the army and how Jewish soldiers reacted to encountering other Jews in the conquered lands of the eastern front, Fine argues that Jews were strongly identified as both Germans and Jews. Finally, utilizing many published and unpublished sources, the author argues that antisemitism was not a primary factor in the war experience of Jewish soldiers.

The Evolution of Strategy: Thinking War from Antiquity to the Present

The Evolution of Strategy: Thinking War from Antiquity to the Present

Is there a 'Western way of war' which pursues battles of annihilation and single-minded military victory? Is warfare on a path to ever greater destructive force? This magisterial new account answers these questions by tracing the history of Western thinking about strategy - the employment of military force as a political instrument - from antiquity to the present day. Assessing sources from Vegetius to contemporary America, and with a particular focus on strategy since the Napoleonic Wars, Beatrice Heuser explores the evolution of strategic thought, the social institutions, norms and patterns of behaviour within which it operates, the policies that guide it and the cultures that influence it. Ranging across technology and warfare, total warfare and small wars as well as land, sea, air and nuclear warfare, she demonstrates that warfare and strategic thinking have fluctuated wildly in their aims, intensity, limitations and excesses over the past two millennia.

Raiders of the China Coast: CIA Covert Operations During the Korean War (Civil War in the West)

Raiders of the China Coast: CIA Covert Operations During the Korean War   (Civil War in the West)

Describes top-secret raids launched by Chinese Nationalist and a colorful band of American adventurers.

Prisoners of Britain: German civilian and combatant internees during the First World War

Prisoners of Britain: German civilian and combatant internees during the First World War

During the First World War hundreds of thousands of Germans faced incarceration in hundreds of camps on the British mainland. This is the first book to be published on these German prisoners, almost a century after the conflict. This account concentrates both upon the bureaucratic decision to introduce internment and the consequences of this government policy for individual lives. The book covers the three different types of male internees who found themselves behind barbed wire in Britain between 1914 and 1919 in the form of: civilians already present in the country in August 1914; civilians brought to Britain from all over the world; and combatants, primarily soldiers from the Western Front, but also naval personnel and a few members of zeppelin crews, whose vessels fell to earth. Using a vast range of contemporary British and German sources, including both the official record and the accounts of numerous internees, the volume traces life experiences through initial arrest and capture to life behind barbed wire to return to a defeated Germany or the remnants of the ethnically cleansed German community in Britain. The study questions the necessity of incarcerating hundreds of thousands of men but places this decision into wider developments in British and European society, bureaucracy and minority persecution. This fascinating volume will prove essential reading for anyone interested in the history of prisoners of war or the First World War and will also appeal to scholars and students of early twentieth century Europe and the human consequences of war.

B-29: Superfortress: Giant Bomber of World War 2 and Korea

B-29: Superfortress: Giant Bomber of World War 2 and Korea

The Boeing B-29 Superfortress was a four-engined heavy bomber flown primarily by the United States in World War Two and the Korean War. The B-29 remained in service in various roles throughout the 1950s. The British Royal Air Force flew the B-29 and used the name Washington for the type, and the Soviet Union produced an unlicensed copy as the Tupolev Tu-4. The name "Superfortress" was derived from that of its well-known predecessor, the B-17 Flying Fortress. The B-29 was the progenitor of a series of Boeing-built bombers, reconnaissance aircraft, trainers and tankers including the variant, B-50 Superfortress.The B-29 was one of the largest aircraft to see service during World War Two. A very advanced bomber for its time, it included features such as pressurized cabins, an electronic fire-control system and remote-controlled machine-gun turrets. Though it was designed as a high-altitude daytime bomber, in practice it actually flew more low-altitude nighttime incendiary bombing missions. It was the primary aircraft in the American firebombing campaign against Japan in the final months of World War Two, and carried the atomic bombs that destroyed Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Unlike many other World War Two-era bombers, the B-29 remained in service long after the war ended, with a few even being employed as flying television transmitters. The type was finally retired in the early 1960s, with 3,960 aircraft in all built.Without doubt there is a clear, strong requirement to ‘put the record straight’ using primary source documentation to record the undoubted achievements alongside and in context with the shortcomings to the type’s design and operation that have otherwise received scant attention.The book will cover all variants and is profusely illustrated.

Calendar and Community: A History of the Jewish Calendar, 2nd Century BCE to 10th Century CE

Calendar and Community: A History of the Jewish Calendar, 2nd Century BCE to 10th Century CE

This volume traces the development of the Jewish calendar from its origins until it reached, in the 10th century CE, its present form. Drawing on a wide range of literary, documentary, and epigraphic sources, this is the first comprehensive book to have been written on this subject. Stern shows that the Jewish calendar evolved during this period from considerable diversity (a variety of solar and lunar calendars) to unity. This consolidation of the calendar is one element in the unification of Jewish identity in later antiquity and the early medieval world.

Long-Range War: Sniping in Vietnam

Long-Range War: Sniping in Vietnam

The Vietnam War marked the first time that the U.S. military brought together trained snipers, custom rifles, telescopic sights, special ammunition and sound suppressors, and employed them successfully in combat. This work focuses on a small but significant aspect of modern military history: the army sniper program, the fielding of the XM21 sniper rifle and the Adjustable Ranging Telescope, and the combat application of sound suppression devices for rifles and special carbines.

Japan 1941: Countdown to Infamy

Japan 1941: Countdown to Infamy

A groundbreaking history that considers the attack on Pearl Harbor from the Japanese perspective and is certain to revolutionize how we think of the war in the Pacific. When Japan launched hostilities against the United States in 1941, argues Eri Hotta, its leaders, in large part, understood they were entering a war they were almost certain to lose. Drawing on material little known to Western readers, and barely explored in depth in Japan itself, Hotta poses an essential question: Why did these men—military men, civilian politicians, diplomats, the emperor—put their country and its citizens so unnecessarily in harm’s way? Introducing us to the doubters, schemers, and would-be patriots who led their nation into this conflagration, Hotta brilliantly shows us a Japan rarely glimpsed—eager to avoid war but fraught with tensions with the West, blinded by reckless militarism couched in traditional notions of pride and honor, tempted by the gambler’s dream of scoring the biggest win against impossible odds and nearly escaping disaster before it finally proved inevitable.In an intimate account of the increasingly heated debates and doomed diplomatic overtures preceding Pearl Harbor, Hotta reveals just how divided Japan’s leaders were, right up to (and, in fact, beyond) their eleventh-hour decision to attack. We see a ruling cadre rich in regional ambition and hubris: many of the same leaders seeking to avoid war with the United States continued to adamantly advocate Asian expansionism, hoping to advance, or at least maintain, the occupation of China that began in 1931, unable to end the second Sino-Japanese War and unwilling to acknowledge Washington’s hardening disapproval of their continental incursions. Even as Japanese diplomats continued to negotiate with the Roosevelt administration, Matsuoka Yosuke, the egomaniacal foreign minister who relished paying court to both Stalin and Hitler, and his facile supporters cemented Japan’s place in the fascist alliance with Germany and Italy—unaware (or unconcerned) that in so doing they destroyed the nation’s bona fides with the West. We see a dysfunctional political system in which military leaders reported to both the civilian government and the emperor, creating a structure that facilitated intrigues and stoked a jingoistic rivalry between Japan’s army and navy. Roles are recast and blame reexamined as Hotta analyzes the actions and motivations of the hawks and skeptics among Japan’s elite. Emperor Hirohito and General Hideki Tojo are newly appraised as we discover how the two men fumbled for a way to avoid war before finally acceding to it. Hotta peels back seventy years of historical mythologizing—both Japanese and Western—to expose all-too-human Japanese leaders torn by doubt in the months preceding the attack, more concerned with saving face than saving lives, finally drawn into war as much by incompetence and lack of political will as by bellicosity. An essential book for any student of the Second World War, this compelling reassessment will forever change the way we remember those days of infamy. 

The Concentration Camps of the Anglo-Boer War: A Social History

The Concentration Camps of the Anglo-Boer War: A Social History

A general history of the concentration camps of the Anglo-Boer War, and the first to make an in-depth use of the very rich and extensive official documents in the South African and British archives, this book provides a fresh perspective on a topic that understandably arouses emotions because of the great numbers of Afrikaners—especially women and children—who died in the camps. Set in the larger context of colonialism at the end of the 19th century, this fascinating account overturns many previously held assumptions and conclusions. Arguing that British views on poverty, poor relief, and the management of colonial societies all shaped administration, this social history also attempts to explain why the camps were so badly administered in the first place and why reform was so slow—suggesting that divided responsibility, ignorance, political opportunism, and a failure to understand the needs of such institutions all played a part.

The Spectacle of Japanese American Trauma: Racial Performativity and World War II

The Spectacle of Japanese American Trauma: Racial Performativity and World War II

In "The Spectacle of Japanese American Trauma", Emily Roxworthy contests the notion that the U.S. government's internment policies during World War II had little impact on the postwar lives of most Japanese Americans. After the war, many Americans behaved as if the "theatre of war" had ended and life could return to normal. Roxworthy demonstrates that this theatrical logic of segregating the real from the staged, the authentic experience from the political display, grew out of the manner in which internment was agitated for and instituted by the U.S. government and media. During the war, Japanese Americans struggled to define themselves within the web of this theatrical logic, and they continue to reenact this trauma in public and private to this day.The political spectacles staged by the FBI and the American mass media were heir to a theatricalizing discourse that can be traced back to Commodore Matthew Perry's "opening" of Japan in 1853. Roxworthy provides the first detailed reconstruction of the FBI's raids on Japanese American communities, which relied on this discourse to justify their highly choreographed searches, seizures, and arrests.Roxworthy juxtaposes her analysis of these political spectacles with the first inclusive look at cultural performances staged by issei and nisei (first- and second-generation Japanese Americans) at two of the most prominent "relocation centers": California's Manzanar and Tule Lake. The camp performances enlarge our understanding of the impulse to create art under oppressive conditions. Taken together, wartime political spectacles and the performative attempts at resistance by internees demonstrate the logic of racial performativity that underwrites American national identity.

Revolt: An Archaeological History of Pueblo Resistance and Revitalization in 17th Century New Mexico (The Archaeology of Colonialism in Native North America)

Revolt: An Archaeological History of Pueblo Resistance and Revitalization in 17th Century New Mexico (The Archaeology of Colonialism in Native North America)

Published in cooperation with the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Southern Methodist University. The Pueblo Revolt of 1680 is the most renowned colonial uprisings in the history of the American Southwest. Traditional text-based accounts tend to focus on the revolt and the Spaniards' reconquest in 1692--completely skipping over the years of indigenous independence that occurred in between. Revolt boldly breaks out of this mold and examines the aftermath of the uprising in colonial New Mexico, focusing on the radical changes it instigated in Pueblo culture and society. In addition to being the first book-length history of the revolt that incorporates archaeological evidence as a primary source of data, this volume is one of a kind in its attempt to put these events into the larger context of Native American cultural revitalization. Despite the fact that the only surviving records of the revolt were written by Spanish witnesses and contain certain biases, author Matthew Liebmann finds unique ways to bring a fresh perspective to Revolt. Most notably, he uses his hands-on experience at Ancestral Pueblo archaeological sites--four Pueblo villages constructed between 1680 and 1696 in the Jemez province of New Mexico--to provide an understanding of this period that other treatments have yet to accomplish. By analyzing ceramics, architecture, and rock art of the Pueblo Revolt era, he sheds new light on a period often portrayed as one of unvarying degradation and dissention among Pueblos. A compelling read, Revolt's "blood-and-thunder" story successfully ties together archaeology, history, and ethnohistory to add a new dimension to this uprising and its aftermath.  

Corsair: The F4U in World War II and Korea

Corsair: The F4U in World War II and Korea

This is the remarkable story of an airplane that became a legend--with a sleek silhouette and bent wings, it doubled as a day and night fighter, could fly off carriers or from land, and served both as a dive bomber and reconnaissance plane. Filled with facts and figures, this fast-paced history begins with the nerve-wracking test flights of the 1940s and concludes with the F4Us that were active thirty-eight years later. Placed skillfully in between are the stories that gave birth to the legend: the exploits of the aces, including the Medal of Honor recipient who shot down twenty-five enemy planes, and the details of the combat missions of Charles A. Lindbergh. During thirty months of combat in World War II with the U.S. Navy and Marines, the Corsair shot down more than two thousand Japanese planes. In Korea the U-bird, as it was called, was credited with ten aerial victories. A trip down memory lane for anyone who has followed the career of this Cadillac of the props, this new paperback edition of a book first published in hardcover in 1979 offers fine historical aviation reading that presents a riveting picture of the men and machine that helped win two wars.